Is flat frequency response a hoax?


I have seen a number of speaker companies claiming that their design has a ruler flat response. They then proudly display a graph with a flat line as if it's an indication of its superior quality. Poppycock.

Flat response is a myth. Everybody has different hearing so there's no reason to expect that there would be a one size fits all frequency response.
We don't all wear the same sized shoes do we? Everybody has different sized feet. 

There are plenty of flat response speakers that sound horrible. I've heard quite a lot. There are many non ruler flat great sounding speakers too.
Do not be duped by this hogwash. 

If the mixing engineer used a pair of speakers that is 3db down in the mids and top end then he may have boosted that region by a similar amount. Now when the track gets played on a ruler flat speaker it sounds too bright. So as you can see, a flat response is useless.







kenjit
" You are either not a real audiophile or you are in denial. If you dont care about sound quality, what makes you an audiophile? "
He doesn't use cheap earbuds for his "golden ears ".
Hey Audiokinesis, they do it already. It is called a hearing aid:)
kenjit 

It is clear that if you put speakers with a "flat response" in a room that has been acoustically treated so that when a flat signal is projected into the room the listener will hear a perfectly flat response.....and if that sounds like BS that is because it is. 
I have seen a number of speaker companies claiming that their design has a ruler flat response. They then proudly display a graph with a flat line as if it’s an indication of its superior quality. Poppycock.
Flat response is a myth. Everybody has different hearing so there’s no reason to expect that there would be a one size fits all frequency response.
We don’t all wear the same sized shoes do we? Everybody has different sized feet.
Once again, you prove that you have almost no idea how and why speaker companies design, build and test speakers.

When frequency response is measured, white noise is used (all frequencies at equal amplitude). This is to get a baseline. Individual differences in human hearing is not taken into consideration at this point.

If one is shopping for speakers (not you of course, you use cheap earbuds), it is a great idea to have a baseline measurement to work off of.

There are plenty of flat response speakers that sound horrible. I’ve heard quite a lot. There are many non ruler flat great sounding speakers too.
Do not be duped by this hogwash.

This is true, but there is a good chance how bad the speaker sounds is unrelated to having a flat frequency response. Frequency response is one of many measurements that are used to determine performance.

If the mixing engineer used a pair of speakers that is 3db down in the mids and top end then he may have boosted that region by a similar amount. Now when the track gets played on a ruler flat speaker it sounds too bright. So as you can see, a flat response is useless.

So, who’s fault is that?

It is not up to the speaker company to try to design their products to compensate for every engineer’s picadillos and idiosyncrasies.

Flat frequency response is a very useful measurement. Without a known starting point, adjustments to modify the sound, might be a shot in the dark.

Let me add, that if your speaker is not relatively flat, how would you even know if the recording is 3db up or down in the mids and top end?