Is bass the most important frequency band?


One thing I’ve noticed when upgrading my audio system is that when I have really good bass, I’m happy. If the bass is top notch, I can overlook less-than-stellar treble or so-so midrange. The opposite does not seem to be true. Sure, I can get tremendous enjoyment out of a high-fidelity playback of a flute or other instrument that doesn’t have much bass impact, but when I switch to a track that has some slam, if my sub/woofers don’t perform, I’m left wanting, and I am inclined to change the track. When my subwoofer game is top notch, there is something extremely pleasing about tight, powerful, and accurate bass response that easily puts a smile on my face and lifts my mood in a matter of seconds. Maybe it all boils down to the fact that bass frequencies are heard AND felt and the inclusion of another sense (touch/feeling) gives bass a competitive edge over midrange and treble. I am not talking about loud bass (although that can be really fun and has its place), but the type of bass that gives you a sense of a kick drum’s size or allows for the double bass to reach out and vibrate the room and your body. I propose to you that bass and sub-bass should be optimized first and foremost, followed by treble and midrange in order to maximize enjoyment. Thoughts?
Previewmkgus
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propose to you that bass and sub-bass should be optimized first and foremost, followed by treble and midrange in order to maximize enjoyment.
Depends on type of music, listening position, music only or also HT duties. For me mid bass and midrange are more important followed by the other two. For most of the music I listen to there is very little information in sub bass and my age limits high frequencies. 
What makes for good sounding bass? Can we measure that?
Yes,  you can measure bass. In order to get good bass a measurement microphone and something like REW helps a lot.
@dabel    

I now have 5 subwoofers in my space. Four for the swarm (distributed bass array) and one for the HT. This sounds counterintuitive, but the results speak for themselves. The swarm is controlled with an inexpensive MiniDsp 2x4, which sets the crossover frequencies and distributes the signal. The only downside, outside of cost, is running all the additional cables.