How to sell audiophile digital collection covering analog-to-digital transition years?


I'm new here, actually created an account some time ago but never used it, so just starting out.

I have a one-owner audiophile digital collection acquired during the analog-to-digital transition years, from the mid/late 70s through early/mid 80s.  Perchance you miss the meaning, these are 30+ year-old albums, not albums acquired over 30+ years, so truly are of collector value.   Of the over 170 albums contained, roughly 50 remain factory sealed, the others having been very gently played once-to-tape (and only once), all platters accordingly in brand-new or like-new pristine condition (the one exception, a treasured Streisand, is stupidly gouged in its first track and priced at zero).  All is explained in great length in the eBay listing I have up, including instruction as to how to obtain the 19-column Excel spreadsheet describing each album in numbing detail.  The collection is roughly 80% classical and jazz, other genres (Beatles, Streisand, Denver, Simon & Garfunkel, etc.) sprinkled throughout.  The listing required several man-weeks to research and compile, plus additional weeks to write and edit and re-edit.  It truly explains all, so if you're of a mind, give it a read.  My intent is to have a potential buyer inspect each album first-hand before negotiating, so title will pass and delivery take place on-the-spot, nothing left to chance.  I am in the Chicago area, the listing speaks as to how that would be handled.

My question is whether there is a better way to sell, possibly here on Audiogon.  Ebay is a means I already am acquainted with, but nothing says I can't spread to new territory.
stanr
Place an ad on Audiogon as you describe above.
I sell records and repair vintage audio equipment making my living in North Carolina Raleigh/Durham area and have a lot to share.

1st I'll mention, if you're speaking of more titles of Streisand except the gouged one, than even in Mint condition they worth near-nothing and sold usually in large quantities at thrift stores in unused condition.

80's jazz shares nearly the same story except few artists out of many such as Gary Burton, Pat Metheny, Bill Frisell, Focus to name a few... I personally collect mostly 80's European jazz labels such as ECM and CMP(now out of business)

Classical: 
In general crowd is looking for those super precious shaded dogs and blue backs in perfect shape, but for me they're not best sounding records by far far and can't be better sounding than your 80's classical records. My personal collection of classics mostly consists of imported pressings and many are 80's imports such as DGG, Philips, Arkiv, Florilgelium, Harmonia... with nice glossy covers and certainly all must be like new or better :-). I sold most of domestic originals on those precious collectible labels after digging the fact that 70's...80's re-issues sounded actually substantially better. Today these titles started to 'pick up' but not reached the desired peak. They're still found in most of used record store bins for very low dollar. When classical customer walks into the store and finds good deal on desired blu-back or shaded dog, one also has a possibility to listen to substantially cheaper re-issue to make final decision what album one wants to place onto personal playback system.

All is explained in great length in the eBay listing I have up, including instruction as to how to obtain the 19-column Excel spreadsheet describing each album in numbing detail.  The collection is roughly 80% classical and jazz, other genres (Beatles, Streisand, Denver, Simon & Garfunkel, etc.) sprinkled throughout.  The listing required several man-weeks to research and compile, plus additional weeks to write and edit and re-edit. 
It's partially true, however 170...200 records to list on DISCOGS will take probably by large degree of magnitude faster. All can be listed in few hours. It takes me a-bit over an hour to list 3 liquor boxes of records there because all the information about particular release is there...

Any internet retail business has HUGE disadvantage that to $3..5 worth record you add $3...5 shipping doubling its price or halving the value of record to get proper final value. On the top of that you're getting brutally stripped by paypal and ebay final value fees where paypal charges commission on your shipping charges as well. One advantage that you can actually save on shipping labels paypal or ebay gives to create instead of creating them directly via USPS site.

I once found the way to properly research this structure and decided to consign my records at record stores one of which I joined and occupy part of the store as a repair lab. 
Record stores are constantly looking to add collections and would agree to consign on certain conditions. When I started consigning I paid very small rent + small commission of 10%. There's NOTHING could beat that around internet + arranged my personal flea-market spot that I used to attend on weekends -- now there's a seller so I don't have to be there anymore.
Please note that record stores also have their own demographic supply-demand specifics and not all records will be sold that successful and that's where you can take them to list on the internet.
That's my strategy that worked so far.

Taking offer for the whole stack, you may get substantially smaller amount per each unit, but perhaps largest amount you can get without hassle of deep research of proper value. After all 200 records is very easy to list: Title/Artist/Label/Serial/Condition and may take less than few hours. 
You can send me personal message with listing so I can tell you figures of retail and wholesale. Shipping of 200 records should be somewhere in high $3x ballpark something like $37 in two uhaul small boxes that are $.77 worth in most of the stores in case if it comes to shipping.