how to run a 230 volt line from my panel??


I am getting a piece of equipment from europe that is set for 230v- I called the manufacturer and they said it can not be rewired to 110 I should simply run a 230 line= i already have 12 gauge wire ran to the stereo room- Is it just a matter of getting a 20 amp 230v breaker for my elec. panel-
Can i use the outlets I have now and a USA type power cord or what do I need to do?- thanks
fluffers
You'd need to run a new line from a new 2 pole breaker in your panel to a new 220Volt outlet in your stereo room.

A 220Volt outlet has a different pinout than a 110V one the left pin is horizontal if mounted with ground towards the bottom. Do not wire a 110V outlet with 220V as you could accidentally plug a 110V component into it .

I'd recommend CLEARLY marking the back end if any IEC cord you use too thus avoiding plugging 220V into a 110V component, the back end of power cord look identical.

I have both 220V and 110V outlets in my music room, If you have any doubt how to do this have your local electrician do it for you.

Best of luck

Peter
If you are intent on doing this then get an electrician in. There could be MANY code restrictions that need to be followed.

In north american homes 230v is generally reserved for stoves and in some cases heating.

Connecting a 230v component to another of 120v may also present a problem.

Best solution - get a steup transformer - at least they are designed for the job.
With regards to the breaker; Yes, a 20A/230V breaker will provide you with the two phases & terminals needed for your run. I'm assuming that 12AWG wire is a dedicated run for your 230V circuit. Wait until you receive the component, find out what configuration the plug is(depends on the country) and get an outlet to match. The option would be to obtain a NEMA 6-20(20A/230V) plug and outlet, then install the plug on the unit's cord. You DO NOT want to run 230V to NEMA 120V outlets. At some point- someone may plug an appliance or component into it, and toast it, or get shocked by the(then hot)chassis.
Rodman

The chassis will not get "live" in the event you describe, chassis is wired with ground only, not neutral. The three wires terminated in a standard 110V outlet in a residential setting are Phase, Neutral and Ground. In a standard 220V outlet it is Phase, Opposing Phase and Ground there is no neutral.

Again I strongly recommend that you get an electrician to do this for you this way you should avoid any costly mixups.

Good Listening

Peter
Disagree about "230v reserved for stoves and heating..."
I have a 240v in my living room for the in wall air conditioner. I COULD (if I felt like it) buy a 240v power conditioner and use that 240 outlet for my stereo (the conditioner I am thinking of uses 240 but outputs 120)
So it is no big deal to install a 240v outlet in a living room. The only thing as mentioned it must have the proper duplex so it can NEVER be mistaken for a 120v outlet.

About the 240v item combined with 120v items.. A very small possibility of an issue (like damaging the 120v stuff) exists if a short developed in just the right way in the 240v item.. But if you are willing to take the risk (low) then it would be up to you.
thanks guys- Ye sthis is a separate line just for this unit- there will be nothing else plugged into it as it will be inmy stereo closet- Just want to be sure on the hook up- If I get the 20 amp breaker and wire it to a 20 amp switch- can I just use the power cord I have now and cut off the end and just get a 20amp connector and am good to go??
You have to make sure you have sufficient service to the panel first, and then

http://www.ehow.com/how_5471283_add-outlet.html
It's unlikely that your new unit, will have an IEC connector(inlet on chassis) that matches the one on your present power cord(http://www.internationalconfig.com/icc5.asp?productgroup=%27IEC%2060309%20%28309%29%20Wiring%20Devices%20and%20Cord%20Sets%27). If it does; you can use(NEC notwithstanding) what ever plug you choose(IF the cord is rated for 20A). Wait until you receive the component and better know what your are dealing with.
Just for perspective, every house has two separate 120 lines coming in. Combining them yields your 240. 240 appliances require two 'hot' leads, hence 240 volts.
BTW: the site I listed shows the configurations of IEC plugs, 125V(C-14) vs 230/250V(C-20). Note that the contacts of your expected 230V component's connector(chassis end) will be(most likely) horizontal, the ones on your 125V cord are vertical. Of course; you can change the IEC outlet, on your chassis or the IEC female, on your cord(http://www.vhaudio.com/connectors-ac.html#OyaideIEC).
First off... Is this a house, townhouse or condo? Seen the latter 2 with 208V, sort of 2/3 phase.

Second... What kind of equipment? Turntable, CDP, preamp or amp? If it's low power consumption, a step-up transformer (Topaz, Phoenix ...) might be easiest, cheapest and safest solution. Sometimes not the quietest. As far as I've seen, only a few turnatables are sensitive going from 50 to 60 Hz.
this is a cdplayer- running in a house- Since I already have the lines run to the room and room in the box it seems the prudent way to go-yes I was planning to ecut the ends of my current power cord and buy the correct connections for a 20 amp wall socket-p does this seem to make sense to everyone or am i missing something- thanks for all the advice--
Europe uses 50 Hz current rather than 60 Hz in North America. I would assume that most transformers nowadays can handle both, but it would be worth confirming.

Michael
Michael

Its actually easier for the transformer to handle 60 Hz than 50 Hz

If its only a CD player with limited current draw Id second the step down isolation transformer, which is likely to cost a lot less than running a new line.

Good Listening

Peter
Just for every ones information.

NEC 2011
Article 210.6 (A)
Occupancy Limitation. In dwelling units, and similar occupancies, the voltage shall not exceed 120 volts, nominal, between conductors that supply,

(2) Cord-and-plug loads 1440 Va, nominal, or less or less than 1/4 HP.

Fluffers,

It's a CDP.... Power consumption is next to nothing. JMO buy a small step-up transformer.

Also worth mentioning the 230V CDP was designed to be fed from a 230V AC grounded power system. A hot, (the ungrounded conductor), and a neutral, (the grounded conductor).

Good chance only one line, the hot conductor is fused inside the CDP.
Good chance the power switch is a single pole and only breaks one line, the hot conductor.
.
One last comment - consider your household insurance policy!

Companies do anything to get out of paying for damage - your solution might just be their "get-out-of-jail-free" card?

Of course, this applies to ANY DIY "power related" project.

Having said that, many Agon'ers probably live with this on a daily basis :-)

Something to ponder - may good fortune always smile upon you, whatewver your solution.
Again I strongly recommend that you get an electrician to do this for you this way you should avoid any costly mixups.
04-17-13: Pbnaudio

Ya, and if the electrician is a State licensed electrician with any smarts he will tell Fluffers he can not install a 240V branch circuit for his/her CDP. Even if Fluffers insists.

The electrician is the professional here in the eyes of the AHJ, (Authority Having Jurisdiction).
The electrician/Contractor will own the installation for life. And any future lawsuits that could go along with it.
LOL, the professional will lose if he tells the court the customer insisted!

Liability alone would/should make the electrician think twice! There are want to be's out there though.....
.
Jea,

Why do you think there is any "risk" in installing a 220V line in a residential setting. If done properly there is no more risk in this than a 120V line. There are special outlets for just this purpose.

220V outlet

And they have special AC plugs designed for this as well

220V AC Cord Cap

Pretty straight forward - till now - its the back end of the AC cord that you need to pay attention to - MARK it clearly - this way you avoid accidentally plugging it into the back of a 120V component.

Id state again that for a low power consuming device like a CD player that generally don't use more then 10 - 20W just go with a isolation step up transformer you will get much more bang for your buck this way and probably better sound too because of the isolation part.

Hammond step-up isolation transformer

This will plug straight into your wall and here is the plug you need to plug into the Hammond

250V/15A Cord Cap And ill say it again, mark the back end of your power cord!

Good listening

Peter
Jea,

Why do you think there is any "risk" in installing a 220V line in a residential setting. If done properly there is no more risk in this than a 120V line. There are special outlets for just this purpose.
04-18-13: Pbnaudio

Pbnaudio,

It does not matter what I think. I merely stated the fact that in a residential dwelling unit, per code, it is prohibited in this case.
If you have a 240V window air conditioner that draws more than 1440 Va, that's fine. That meets code.

NEC 2011
Article 210.6 (A)
Occupancy Limitation. In dwelling units, and similar occupancies, the voltage shall not exceed 120 volts, nominal, between conductors that supply,

(2) Cord-and-plug loads 1440 Va, nominal, or less or less than 1/4 HP.

Key words here are "In dwelling units, and similar occupancies,"

"(2) Cord-and-plug loads 1440 Va, nominal, or less or less than 1/4 HP."

1440 Va , nominal or less.

I didn't write the code. The AHJ could care less about the OPs new 230V CDP.

The receptacle and plug you sited in your post are NEMA standard devices and are UL Listed for uses that fall under the guidelines of NEC.

In a commercial building you can have as many 240V receptacle outlets for loads less than 1440 Va you want using the recepts and plugs you linked in your post.
You just can't do it, by code, in your dwelling unit and similar occupancies.

I am still waiting for someone on Agon or AA to post a new thread, who just bought a newly built house, asking about all those breakers in the electrical panel that have a green test push button on them. AFCI breakers.... Audio enthusiasts are going to love them.
Jim
.
Just do what you want. But make sure it's safe. Not for the AHJ, NEMA, NEC or whoever, but for you. In my own house, in this country, I'm going to do what I want whether some pencil-neck making decisions for everyone approves or not. My goodness, look at the NRA.
Jea

Thanks for the clarification I was not aware of that. Sounds like the step up isolation transformer is the way to go.

I obtained my electrical engineering degree in Denmark, where standard household current is 220VAC and each home have a 3 phase supply with 380VAC between the phases and 220V between neutral and phase.

Good Listening

Peter
Do you think the "pencil necks" are sitting somewhere making up arbitrary rules ? Codes are meant to preserve your life and safety.
Quite often, yes:)