How Do You Pronounce Thiel?


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Is it "Teel" or "Theel"?
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Convert?fit=crop&h=128&policy=eyjlehbpcnkioje0otu5otqzntgsimnhbgwiolsicmvhzcisimnvbnzlcnqixx0%3d&rotate=exif&signature=c673c47045cdc5b0fac18c95c5415cad327e3da97a7ed1023530b5cbfdcb695c&w=128mitch4t
Like the duck!
Call them and find out what the receptionist says when she answers the phone. It's neither!
It is pronounced 'TEAL' like the color.(blue + green make teal) Pretty simple really. Jim was around a long time and he attented many shows and introduced himself.
Tom6897 is correct. One of my stores was a Thiel dealer way back when. It is pronounced "TEAL".
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I had always heard it with the 'h' silent also. My neighbor is considering buying a pair and he asked me which was the correct pronunciation.
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Can anyone tell me the difference between the pronunciation of TEEL and TEAL. I pronounce them the same.
I met Jim and he introduced himself as (pronounced) "Teal."
The receptionist, I believe, has a Kentucky accent, and it comes out "Till." But everyone is correct, it's like the color.
Does the name of the color come from the duck or the name of the duck come from the color? In a related question: which came first, the duck or the egg?
Duckling becomes duck.
"The receptionist, I believe, has a Kentucky accent, and it comes out "Till."

Know is that like "to cultivate the ground" or "up to the time of"?

You have to love the English language. :-)

Nice speakers by the way.
It is as mentioned, pronounced TEEL or TEAL but you must lean back about 5-7 degrees to make it sound correct! Just as BOSE pronounced BOZE should be pronounced facing in the opposite direction and Klipsch pronounced CLIP-SHH should be pronounced with your hands cupped on either side of your mouth.:)
I was stationed in Kentucky in the Army.
My first name is Mike.
I worked with a guy named MacFarland who they called Mac.
I was the only one who never knew when they were saying "Mike" and when they were saying "Mac." The locals would say "Not you, I said Mike" and point to Mac.
Thats a good one Theo;I like the angle offset comment !!!
member Lrsky would surely know. I am cheaply taking this opportunity to get him to chime in here more often. Hey Larry... we miss ya'


01-12-12: Isochronism
member Lrsky would surely know. I am cheaply taking this opportunity to get him to chime in here more often. Hey Larry... we miss ya'
Isochronism (Answers | This Thread)

He must of found himself a woman!
Orpheus10,

There is a slight difference in the pronunciation of TEEL and TEAL but it would take a trained ear (like that of an actor or someone for who English is/was a second language).
TEEL has a long 'e' and TEAL has a long 'e' with a soft 'a'.
It would be like saying MERRY, MARRY and MARY. There is a difference if you were to strive to pronounce them the way they are spelt.
I know it sounds like splitting hairs (hares) but I remember this from some college course.
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Nonoise, you are splitting already split hairs. They are the same.
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Split they are but it's amazing how they can dice.
As a youth I always thought it funny how sometimes someone from another country would say something that sounded funny but it was pointed out to me that they were speaking it correctly and it was I who was mangling the word.
Whow i didnt know that.Dudes!
A hi-five to Hifihvn!
Thiel, teel and teal are all pronounced the same.

I find it interesting that more people have responded to this thread than threads with actual questions about stereo equipment. Maybe the questions about stereo equipment have not been very interesting.
01-13-12: Rrog
Thiel, teel and teal are all pronounced the same.

I find it interesting that more people have responded to this thread than threads with actual questions about stereo equipment. Maybe the questions about stereo equipment have not been very interesting.
Rrog (Answers | This Thread)


Uh-oh. He must be the boss. I wonder if this is a good time to ask for a raise?
For our next word we will study the differences between the pronunciation of "steel' and "steal".
have you noticed around here 'base' & 'bass' is pronounced the same? think i'll go smoke some freebass now
I don't know but there is a show on tv called sesame street and they have a funky dude on there called Big Bird and he knows how to pronounce everything.
This is not post worthy. This person needs to go elsewhere and waste time.
Nonoise is correct, and certainly no artist, whether musician (singer) or actor, would disagree. In fact, they wouldn't even consider this hairsplitting. Thiel, teel, and teal are indeed pronounced slightly differently. Perhaps inflected might be a better term?

I also wonder that if someone does not agree that there is a difference, and an important one, between the sounds of these three pronunciations, then should that person be trusted on their opinions about audio reproduction system subtleties, which are quite a bit harder to hear in many cases? This is reminding me a little of a guy who thought he could hear very subtle differences between two different tone arms used with the same exact equipment, yet could not distinguish the difference between a violin and a viola, or a French horn and a trombone.
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Now I see why so many snake oil products proliferate in audio. Some shyster will come along, sell some snake oil and tell him it improves his gear...when in fact it is still the same. When you know you can't hear any difference, the shyster tells you to listen more closely. The shyster knows that you want the supposed improvement to be better...because he's charging you for it, so you imagine it's better to justify your purchase.

Well, I'm not buying and I'm not listening any closer. Teel, Thiel, Teal are all the same.

Nonoise was splitting hairs that were already split. Learsfool, you are splitting the hair root.
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By the way, the best speakers I've heard were Thiel; I couldn't afford them but I liked the sound so much I had an engineer design a crossover that would get me the same sound, and built my own.
All I was doing was pointing out that phonetically speaking, nothing rhymes.
Rhymes are for children and my point was never meant to offend, just to point out that there are lessons from youth that we need to get to keep in touch with from time to time.
That, and nothing more.

As for Learsfool's comment, i think he may be onto something. Subtle differences that some of us 'claim' to hear, which others don't, have led to some very acrimonious debates here, or was it hear.
According to the dictionary I have here, teal and teel are indeed pronounced the same, "teel" or (IPA) "til".
Yes, a dictionary will give you what is historically the most used pronunciation and/or usage and rate it accordingly with the most used to the least used. Some go even further and state what is the correct pronunciation and what is now accepted. That, and there are only so many ways to define how something is said by way of writing it. But, in speech classes one learns that the human voice is so varied and beautiful and expressive and that there is really only one way, barring geographically induced slang and idioms and therefore dialects, to say something.
Now, that is splitting hairs.
I like to pretend its German and yell it out like "Tile"!
LOL, you dont need an engineer to design a first order crossover.
Hi Mitch - actually, I really don't believe that this is hair splitting at all. Stage actors work very hard on their diction to make such differences, and I am sure that a phonetics expert would sound Thiel, teal, and teel all differently. To start with, those are three different dipthongs.

To change this to a musical example, take articulation (think transients, with respect to audio reproduction). We musicians work countless hours on this and many other technical things that the audience is expected to catch.

I submit that these are exactly the kinds of subtle differences that our high end audiophile systems are supposed to accurately resolve. If you are not listening for these kinds of subtle differences, why exactly do you own a hi-fi system?

Granted, the human voice is capable of even more expression and subtlety than other instruments. One of the recordings I always use when testing equipment is John Gielgud's Ages of Man recording (his one man Shakespeare show).
What a tough question.HELLO!!
Mitch is RIGHT ON - this is no different than "meat", "mete" and "meet" - they are all EXACTLY the same word phonetically (look it up)!!!
Isochronism...
Thanks...been busy...I just posted (in November) a book that I wrote...on Amazon/Kindle.
Trying to sell some copies...hey, I'm a capitalist, lol.

As to, THIEL...it IS indeed Teel, or Teal, silent h.

Speaking of which..there's not a day that goes by that I don't think of my old friend Jim...a gentle soul, so smart he radiated unbelievable intelligence along with simultaneous gentleness....fun, funny guy...wow.

So...thanks for the kind words...if you'd like to buy my book...$2.99 for a download book...it's called, "In Plain Sight"..by L. R. Staples...and you do NOT need a Kindle to download it...there's a free PC App...I have it on my pc...I don't own a Kindle either.

I'll try to stay closer to the site guys..

Good listening,

Larry
AND,
Hifihvn, Actually, luckily for me, I've found several...but not the right one. Thought I had...but no.

Women are more frustrating than HI FI, if you can believe or understand that one.

Larry
Women are more frustrating than HI FI, if you can believe or understand that one.
Oh yes.
Hi Meinhard - just because three words would be spelled the same in a phonetic alphabet (which I do not dispute, by the way), does not mean that they are not pronounced differently. A phonetic alphabet is just a starting point, not an end result. I refer you to one of Bernard Shaw's most popular plays, Pygmalion, for a great discussion of this, both in the work itself and in Shaw's preface to it, where he advocates a phonetic alphabet (he actually left money in his will for this express purpose!). Any professional speaker such as an actor would make a difference between those three words, if they were spoken in close proximity, to aid understanding. And this discussion doesn't take into account accents, or other changes in pronunciation. In Shakespeare's time, for instance, "meat" was often pronounced "mayt."