Help with isolation for Linn LP12 on wood floor


Hi,

Thanks again to all members with their help with my previous hum issue. Now this system "Tubes that rock" is almost there! I moved the Turntable from the right side to the left side of the wall unit and it seems to be more acceptable to vibration and skips when someone walks by. I am not getting feedback while playing but I think it would sound better with some type of isolation device or isolation shelf etc. Unfortunately I know nothing about them. Suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks to all for your invaluable help
weiserb
Most recommend wall mounted shelves for suspension tables like the Linn and Thorens.
My experience dating back 25 years is that the LP-12 doesn't like any sort of wall unit. I still use my original Sound Organisation table from the 1980's which is a simple stiff lightweight steel frame table which holds only the LP-12. It has spikes on the legs. No problems on my hardwood floor. I've experimented with other things such as top of equipment racks, wall units, etc and it was a disaster - skipping just as you describe. I concur that a stiff lightweight steel frame wall shelf is also a proven alternative.
Try the rubber/foam component isolation feet.

www.oregondv.com/
Up and down is good - the suspension can handle it. Rotations or side to side are not so good. If you can eliminate the latter in favour of the former, the Linn will be a happy little Scot.

Regards,
I had the same problem. A piece of 1X2 wood cut to the proper lenght and then wedged very tightly between the back of my audio rack and the wall behind it cured the problem completely.
Wall mount laddy!

DV
I am having my best vinyl playback results ever using a wall mouted shelf. And my building was built in 1888 and has suspended wood floors which spring up and down even when our cat walks across the floor. However, you have to be sure you are using a stuctural wall that extend down to the foundation for best results.
I've been using mine on SoundOrganization wall mount rack for 20> yrs. to very good effect.
The lightweight base that forms the "floor" seems to be key. I've tried various substitutes, always gone back to the lightweight one
Don
I used to have a Target wall shelf for my Linn. I found that it was better than floor mounting in order to avoid footstep vibrations. However, it depended on the wall. I found exterior walls to be better than interior, partition walls. With some walls, it was no better than having the table on the floor.
I used a wall mount on a previous system and its definately the best solution, but in this installation it must sit on the shelf in the wall unit see picture "tubes that rock" There is a pocket door behind wall unit so I can not do a wall shelf.
If you are on the ground floor, and there is a crawl space below your listening area, you may want to try reinforcing the floor joists directly under your turntable stand using blocks and wood shims between the bottom of the joists and the ground. This worked well for my LP12 in one off-grade house where I used to live.

A wall-mount may not work very well on an interior wall since interior wall frames are simply nailed to the sub-floor with no building foundation directly below as is the case with exterior walls.
I have a Thorens TD160 suspended table in my living room with a raised wood floor. I have owned the table only four weeks, so the installation is temporary. I have it on a 1940s vintage steamer trunk that is filled with probably 60 lbs of "stuff". I have the table sitting on 3/8" sorbothane feet.

There is absolutely no issue with vibration or skipping...including during moments of dancing or jumping around.

Maybe I'm just lucky with this set up.
Oh mercy - you poor people with wooden houses... I feel for you - really I do... Here in South Africa it is against the law to build a wooden structure in town. All residential housing must be from brick and concrete...

DV
02-12-07: Dewald_visser
Oh mercy - you poor people with wooden houses... I feel for you - really I do... Here in South Africa it is against the law to build a wooden structure in town. All residential housing must be from brick and concrete...

In Los Angeles, brick houses tend to fall down in earthquakes, killing people in the process. Wooden houses don't necessarily fare better, but they tend to stay together thus preventing walls from falling on top of the occupants.
In Los Angeles, brick houses tend to fall down in earthquakes
Smile. A similar situation here in Silicon Valley. The fault line is within 50 miles of my house.

Regards,
No earthquakes here in South Africa though... just very high crime and murder rates... people killing other people...

DV