good rca y-adapter


I am looking for a y-adapter (2 male to 1 female) so I can run a sub woofer off the pre out of my integrated amp. Want something good enough to replace existing silver jumpers without big fall off in quality. For reference, Audioquest stnd copper jumpers not as good sounding as my silver wires. Ideas?
knownothing

Some cable makers will actually make for you a Y adapter. Voodoo, Cardas, etc.

I was going to do exactly this notion... but kept trying out this and that el cheapo Y's instead.

Rather than spend around $200 for a connection to my sub, I finally settled on Ye Olde Rat Shackeys $6 Gold Series Y.

For $75 you can get one premade from that co which makes everything you need to DIY your own ICs, etc. Gosh I can't think of the name right now. I will though.

Unless... and perhaps not even then, you get a Y made by the same folks of whose cabling you perfer now, they're all gonna sound different, aren't they?

Even then, if that co has changed material sources... connector sources... uses new tech, Oh, and yours have some age on them now too....

I'm saying getting identical wire to what tyou have now seems nigh on to impossible.... and primarily why I settled on the El Cheapo's.. Changing out the subs power cord was a more favorable process and result.

The couple inches of Y wasn't nearly the change that the 12 ft of IC to it yielded, or the upscale pc I put onto my sub.

Maybe you can have your ICs terminated into a Y by their makers!

But best of luck
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From your description of what you're trying to accomplish I think what you need is an adapter that is 2 female, 1 male, like the one Ericjcabrera offered.

An alternative to a cable Y adapter is this kind of splitter. It gives you a direct connection and is probably less expensive than the high-quality cable splitters. I've used this Audioquest version in a couple of setups and it works perfectly. Monster makes a high-quality one, as well.
I used Voodoo for an adapter for my Shunyata Python with a NEMA plug to a 15amp IEC and they were fast and I was pretty happy with the product.
thanks for the input, helpful.

i am thinking i have a design flaw. i wanted to combine the left and right preamp outputs for the sub downstream of the splitters, in order to only have to run one cable to the sub. But am wondering what that will do to sound quality of stereo signals from splitters upstream run into the inputs for the amplifier section of integrated. not smart enough to figure this out but intuition tells me this is a bad idea. please advise.
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thanks. the sub i need to use in this application does not have high level inputs. two rca sub cables problematic but not impossible. probably should just bite bullet and buy and install another sub cable.
I wanted to combine the left and right preamp outputs for the sub downstream of the splitters, in order to only have to run one cable to the sub. But am wondering what that will do to sound quality of stereo signals from splitters upstream run into the inputs for the amplifier section of integrated. not smart enough to figure this out but intuition tells me this is a bad idea. please advise.
Your intuition is correct. For starters, you won't have stereo signals going into the amplifier section of the integrated, since L & R will be shorted together. Beyond that, IMO it would not be good practice to connect L & R preamp outputs together, for the sub, even if they were separately buffered and completely independent of the main signal path (although I realize some people do that, with reasonable results).

If L & R are shorted together, and the recording has an instrument that is off to one side, so that its sound is pretty much in just one channel, then the load impedance that will be seen by the circuit driving that channel will be the output impedance of the other channel.

You are probably familiar with the 10x rule of thumb for matching preamp output impedance to power amp input impedance. In this situation the ratio of load impedance to output impedance would be only 1x. To the extent that those impedances vary differently as a function of frequency (e.g., due to component tolerances), frequency response flatness would be messed up. If the preamp outputs are ac-coupled, meaning that a capacitor is in series with the outputs, bass response would undoubtedly be affected. In some cases the output driver circuit may simply not be able to handle the heavy load, without audible signs of stress. Finally, and perhaps most significantly, the volume with which each instrument is reproduced will vary by up to 6db depending on the degree to which its position is off center.

Best regards,
-- Al
that is really helpful, thanks.