GoldenEar Triton One


Does anyone have experience with GE Triton Ones with 2 channel listening. Most reviews seem to be from people with home theatre. These reviews are extremely positive.
rafr
No, no, I don't care what you buy, I was voicing my opinion against Chinese made stuff with high end prices, which is ridiculous, imo.

Yes, that's true, I have no US made equipment at the present time. I bought all of it new, actually. Whenever it is that I upgrade, that will change.
Hypocrites and sinners in general often give the best advice .
God made the world.
China made everything else.
Chinese children are required to study music.

Under the Law on Nine-Year Compulsory Education, primary schools were to be tuition-free and reasonably located for the convenience of children attending them; students would attend primary schools in their neighborhoods or villages....The primary-school curriculum consisted of Chinese, mathematics, physical education, music, drawing, and elementary instruction in nature, history, and geography, combined with practical work experiences around the school compound....
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education_in_China#Compulsory_education_law

The Chinese language is itself based on harmonic tones.

All varieties of Chinese, like neighbouring languages in the Mainland Southeast Asia linguistic area, have phonemic tones. Each syllable may be pronounced with between three and six distinct pitch contours, denoting different morphemes. The number of tonal contrasts varies between dialects, with northern dialects tending to have fewer distinctions than southern ones.[66] For example, in the standard language the four phonemic tones can be demonstrated with ma (?; "mother"), má (?; "hemp"), ma (?; "horse") and mà (?; "to scold"). Many dialects have tone sandhi, in which the pitch contour of a syllable is affected by the tones of adjacent syllables in a compound word of phrase.[67] This process is so extensive in Shanghainese that the tone system is reduced to a pitch accent system much like modern Japanese. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Varieties_of_Chinese

Hence, it is easy to see why there is a musical heritage in Chinese culture.

As a part of 2006 Harbin Summer Music Concert's opening ceremony, a 1,001-piano concert was held in Harbin's Flood memorial square located at the north end of Zhongyang Street (Chinese: ????; pinyin: Zhongyang dàjie) on August 6, 2006.[106][107] Repertoires of the ensemble consisted of Triumphal March, Military March, Radetzky March and famous traditional local song On The Sun Island?. This concert set a new Guinness World Record for largest piano ensemble, surpassing the previous record held by German artists in a 600-piano concert.[14] In 2008, the 29th Harbin Summer Music Concert was held on August 6. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harbin

I anticipate that with the modernization of China, we will see an amazing contribution from China to global music. As the Chinese middle class grows, I expect to see a veritable explosion of higher-end audio components from China, particularly as the second-generation starts demanding higher-end gear.
Rafr, just resurrecting this topic as I have recently (December 2015) purchased and use T1s in a two channel setup. The speakers are connected to a Musical Fidelity M6si.

Suffice it to say - and trust me I have heard dozens of high end systems (primarily solid sate some tube) - and I am so happy with my audio gear I wouldn't even consider anything else. I've even listened to a pair of Alta Statement Towers that retail for $200,000 a pair. 

Value wise NOTHING can beat the Tritons. Every professional review compares the T1s to speakers costing four or more times it's price, and I wholeheartedly agree. All types of music playback is simply seamless as far as the crossovers. I could go on and on but you get the idea. Awesome speakers to say the least.

As to their being made in China, I would venture to say that in this global economy of today, virtually every product is made to some degree (between design and actual assembly) in multiple places. In this case, being made in China is a big reason why the price is relatively low and the OVERALL VALUE is outstanding. Granted, these speakers are relatively new to market and I do agree the "test of time" can also be very telling. Hopefully there will be no issues, but to that extent I can also say that GoldenEar actively and aggressively stands behind their products.