GoldenEar Triton One

Does anyone have experience with GE Triton Ones with 2 channel listening. Most reviews seem to be from people with home theatre. These reviews are extremely positive.
The Triton Ones are very transparent, detailed with bass that is balanced with regards to the mids and trebles. The soundstage was OK, but the store couldn't move the speakers any further from the side walls than about 2 ft. because of in wall speaker cables and only 3 ft. of play. The only main drawback would be that the speaker is entirely covered with a sock and if you are a cat lover, the speaker is one nice scratching post.
Just received mine this week... Don't let the home theater context fool you...these are awesome dedicated 2 channel stereo speakers. Although the other GE models (passive and active) are worth considering, and probably well worth the money, the Triton One is on a whole nother level. They are warm yet detailed...the bass is...well... something you need to experience for yourself (And no, I'm not a bass/buzz freak). The soundstage and transparency is akin to my previous Maggie 1.6s. I'm very pleased with them. The price tag is (for me) a tough pill to swallow...but I know I am getting my money's worth.
Made in China?
Dave 72, of course they are made in China. If fact all their speakers are made in China.
So what, almost all of our cell phones are made in China too. You have to remember this is an American company, manufacturing in China. It's not a Chinese owned company.
I have had my Triton Ones since January 2015 in a strictly 2 channel high end system. The soundstage extends way beyond the speakers, imaging is perfect, bass is to die for, mids are extremely smooth and the highs are very sweet with the perfect amount of sparkle. I had absolutely no regrets with these speakers and they always put a smile on my face. They can play extremely loud or extremely soft and never lose their balance.

One of my best audio purchases.
Thank you for your responses.
I was able audition a pair of Triton Ones.They sounded phenomenal at the dealers. I will certainly be considering them.
Ok, however, cell phones don't cost as much as these speakers do. We're not talkin' about phones anyway, we're talkin' about speakers here. There's no reason imo, for Chinese made stuff with high end price tags, like Monitor Audio.
You'd be surprised at how much "high end" stuff is make in China. Monitor Audio would be the least of your worries.

All the best,
Yeah, with high prices, and that's absolutely terrible, imo. I can't believe people would pay such large amounts for stuff made over there! But, if they want it bad enough, so be it! Argh!!!
Dave 72, I have never understood that.
Whatever you decide, be sure to audition the T1s beside at least one other brand of speaker under the same conditions.

I listened to some T2s at a local dealer a while ago, and was impressed. Then we moved to B&W CM10, and there was no comparison. The B&Ws had much better timbre, a more "rounded" representation, each instrument sounded more like itself, and had better delineation, spatially and timbrally. They made the T2s sound electronic by comparison.
Haven't heard the T2's so can't comment. I am not a fan of B&W speakers in general and I auditioned 2 of the B&W speakers in addition to the T!. I'll sum it up in 2 words: too bright. Too bright with the type of music I listen to which is Rock from mid 60's to the present and some Jazz. I listen to Rock (Pink Floyd, Tool, Disturbed, Nirvana, etc 95% of the time. Perhaps for the type of music you listen to, the B&W's are a better choice.

Regarding the speakers being made in China, I would have gladly paid 8K for the speakers if they were made in the USA which is probably the price difference between China and the USA. These speakers are in a decent high end system 35K+ and the rest of my system, amp-Odyssey(USA), Tube Pre-Audible Illusions (USA), Turntable-VPI (USA), DAC-Wyred4Sound (USA), Tuner-Magnum Dynalab (Canada), all power cables and 3 power conditioners-Shunyata (USA), SACD player-Esoteric (Japan).

I feel no shame in the speakers being made in China with at least 80% of my system made in North America, the American worker has profited.
I'm sick of hearing that; "take a look at your belongings and blah blah blah."

Makes no sense and completely out of context. We're talking about hi fi equipment made in China selling for premium prices here in the US and Canada, not common goods and foodstuffs.

I do appreciate that most of your components are US made. My hat's off to you. Unfortunately I have no US made components at the present time. Turntable (Technics) is Japan, CD player (Onkyo) is Malaysia, amp and preamp (Bryston) are Canada, and speakers (JBL) are Mexico. But, I got great deals on each piece, which is something most non well-heeled audiophiles couldn't pass up. I probably got the deals due to the fact that they were made outside of the US. When I upgrade, I'm going to make sure that at least 1 unit is US made.
Stereo5: you miss my point.

At the audition that I was describing, the B&Ws just happened to be in the same room (so easy to hook up), and the CM10s were--of the selection there--the closest in price to the Tritons.

I wasn't recommending the B&Ws as such, just pointing out that the Tritons could sound pretty good on their own, but needed to be compared to another brand/model. I'm guessing many others could substitute for the B&Ws, though--personally--I was quite impressed by the CM10s (save for a slight bass rolloff).

Comparing the two, it became clear to me that the Triton 2s were engineered first for home theatre applications, and that for some people they would serve fine for stereo.

I haven't heard the 1s and don't know how much of an improvement they represent. But based on the experience with the 2s, careful auditioned--and above all, careful comparisons--are called for.

Kind of hypocritical aren't you? You sound off on my buying a pair of speakers made in China yet all your equipment is made everywhere but the USA and you have the audacity to justify it by saying you bought it all used.

Sounds like the pot calling the kettle black.
No, no, I don't care what you buy, I was voicing my opinion against Chinese made stuff with high end prices, which is ridiculous, imo.

Yes, that's true, I have no US made equipment at the present time. I bought all of it new, actually. Whenever it is that I upgrade, that will change.
Hypocrites and sinners in general often give the best advice .
God made the world.
China made everything else.
Chinese children are required to study music.

Under the Law on Nine-Year Compulsory Education, primary schools were to be tuition-free and reasonably located for the convenience of children attending them; students would attend primary schools in their neighborhoods or villages....The primary-school curriculum consisted of Chinese, mathematics, physical education, music, drawing, and elementary instruction in nature, history, and geography, combined with practical work experiences around the school compound....

The Chinese language is itself based on harmonic tones.

All varieties of Chinese, like neighbouring languages in the Mainland Southeast Asia linguistic area, have phonemic tones. Each syllable may be pronounced with between three and six distinct pitch contours, denoting different morphemes. The number of tonal contrasts varies between dialects, with northern dialects tending to have fewer distinctions than southern ones.[66] For example, in the standard language the four phonemic tones can be demonstrated with ma (?; "mother"), má (?; "hemp"), ma (?; "horse") and mà (?; "to scold"). Many dialects have tone sandhi, in which the pitch contour of a syllable is affected by the tones of adjacent syllables in a compound word of phrase.[67] This process is so extensive in Shanghainese that the tone system is reduced to a pitch accent system much like modern Japanese.

Hence, it is easy to see why there is a musical heritage in Chinese culture.

As a part of 2006 Harbin Summer Music Concert's opening ceremony, a 1,001-piano concert was held in Harbin's Flood memorial square located at the north end of Zhongyang Street (Chinese: ????; pinyin: Zhongyang dàjie) on August 6, 2006.[106][107] Repertoires of the ensemble consisted of Triumphal March, Military March, Radetzky March and famous traditional local song On The Sun Island?. This concert set a new Guinness World Record for largest piano ensemble, surpassing the previous record held by German artists in a 600-piano concert.[14] In 2008, the 29th Harbin Summer Music Concert was held on August 6.

I anticipate that with the modernization of China, we will see an amazing contribution from China to global music. As the Chinese middle class grows, I expect to see a veritable explosion of higher-end audio components from China, particularly as the second-generation starts demanding higher-end gear.
Rafr, just resurrecting this topic as I have recently (December 2015) purchased and use T1s in a two channel setup. The speakers are connected to a Musical Fidelity M6si.

Suffice it to say - and trust me I have heard dozens of high end systems (primarily solid sate some tube) - and I am so happy with my audio gear I wouldn't even consider anything else. I've even listened to a pair of Alta Statement Towers that retail for $200,000 a pair. 

Value wise NOTHING can beat the Tritons. Every professional review compares the T1s to speakers costing four or more times it's price, and I wholeheartedly agree. All types of music playback is simply seamless as far as the crossovers. I could go on and on but you get the idea. Awesome speakers to say the least.

As to their being made in China, I would venture to say that in this global economy of today, virtually every product is made to some degree (between design and actual assembly) in multiple places. In this case, being made in China is a big reason why the price is relatively low and the OVERALL VALUE is outstanding. Granted, these speakers are relatively new to market and I do agree the "test of time" can also be very telling. Hopefully there will be no issues, but to that extent I can also say that GoldenEar actively and aggressively stands behind their products.

Heard the Trition 1 today at a dealer along with New Quad electrostatic speakers.

I loved them. Connected to 4k pre/amp quads with and olive supplying the source.

It was incredible. Very balanced through the whole frequency. all natural and impressive. I guess some people could  want something a little more refined but I would be thrilled to have them. I really am thinking about starting to save. I would encourage people to hear them if they get a chance.