FR64s Dynamic or Static Balance


I have a FR64s that I am using now with a Koetsu Jade and FR7f. What combinations of dynamic and static balance have users experimented with and decided worked more favourably-- or not?

Thanks,
nkj
I use 0.75g dynamic and the balance static for my Koetsu Black & FR1mk3. I use precision scales for both - the markings on the dynamic balance knob are not accurate.
As Dover suggested, most internet gurus have recommended about a 50/50 distribution of the VTF between dynamic and static.  However, I do find that the venier setting for VTF on my FR64S is accurate to within +/-0.1 gm, if I take great care in zero balancing the tonearm with the venier set to "0".  But most of the time, I am too lazy to fret over that.  I have never done the experiment carefully enough to say that I can confirm the belief that mixing the two modes of setting VTF is beneficial; I just do it that way.
Thanks for the input everyone.

I got advice from Dertonarm to use 50/50 VTF adjustment;

50 with weight adjustment and 50 with ''spring'' (aka dynamic

adjustment). This imply using an ''external'' VTF scale .

But as by Lew my ''spring scale'' is perfect,  very practical

and easy to use so I have no desire to complicate the matter.

More time to listen to the music than mess with adjustments.

Dear @nkj : This is not a true issue about that 50%/50% or other %s.

The real subjects here is that other than the MS 237/282 and GST 801 tonearms all the other dynamic balanced tonearms develops additional distortions through its dynamic mechanism to set up the VTF.

So ( I still have my 64s. ) my answer is to stay far away as you can to use the FR dynamic mechanism no matters what.

In the other side when you make the VTF set up using the static way you have several improvements between them that the tonearm counterweigth will stays nearer to the tonearm bearing/pivot.

You can do what ever you want it and if you use that VTF dynamic mechanism you just stay wrong in that regards. Your choice.

Regards and enjoy the MUSIC NOT DISTORTIONS,
R.