Floorstanding Speakers on Platforms


I am wondering if placing Amati Futuras with spikes onto a maple component platform before placing them on a hardwood floor is advisable, or should I just use the spikes on the Amati Futuras onto the hardwood floor. Will I hear a difference?
timyamasaki
You will not know until you try. With most things in Audio, it all matters. Sometimes for the better or worse or no discernable difference at all. Good luck with your experience ūüćÄ
Right. Put them on Townshend Podiums, you will definitely hear a difference. Not just a difference either, but huge improvement!

Spikes are frankly one of the worse options. Regardless of who makes them or what is claimed, all you have to do is compare to hear the ringing and emphasis they add. 
In the past I have spent a good bit of money attempting to isolate my speakers. But that is only part of the problem- placement can make or break the overall enjoyment as every room is different. 

My solution was to buy wooden dollys from Harbor Freight with hard rubber wheels. Super cheap and incredibly useful to accomplish both tasks

hth
You will hear a difference if paying attention to things such as the relative height of the soundstage, the locus of the drivers, etc. The reason you will hear the difference is almost entirely to the elevation of the speaker, and has much less to do with the purported pedigree of the stand. 

Tweak1, the Vapor Audio Joule White Speakers I used to own following review at Dagogo.com were difficult to move about, so I lifted them atop lower cost casters, Home Depot ilk, I believe. Superb improvement of the speaker overall, attributable to the lift. One does not have to spend a fortune to achieve the vast majority of improvement.  I still have two dozen hard rubber hockey pucks at my disposal for whatever changes I wish.  
In my experience, Douglas_Schroeder is correct about the benefits of speaker elevation alone, irrespective of the pedigree of the stand.  Although the stand design can add performance, it need not be expensive.

I discovered this first-hand, when I compared two well-known vibration products at $400 and $1100. ¬†During my evaluation of each, a person pointed out to me what Doug posted above: much of what I was liking was attributable to the roughly 3‚ÄĚ height increase of the speakers. ¬†So to test that, I placed 16‚ÄĚ square concrete pavers with an oak plywood square on top to equal the height of the purchased products. ¬†The SQ improvement was shockingly close for almost no money. ¬†Then I tested the stack with Herbie‚Äôs Big Fat Dots added (about $100, IIRC). ¬†That set up was better in SQ to my ear, providing what sounded like deeper and more solid bass. ¬†My situation is mine. ¬†Others might reach different conclusions. ¬†My floor is suspended with carpet. ¬†Not concrete.¬†

Then after a new chair raised my ears by over 3‚ÄĚ, I became very aware that my sound image was undesirably low, so I built custom adjustable platforms for the Herbies/speakers that allowed me to experiment with height (between 4 and almost 9 inches off the floor) and assure plumb/level‚ÄĒwhich I find absolutely critical to achieving exact set-up symmetry. ¬†For insanely good imaging.

But now I am onto evaluating springs.  And, thus far, inexpensive springs from Amazon are a significant improvement over the Herbie’s on my platforms.  Next, going to evaluate some higher performing springs and make a platform of greater mass and rigidity.