DVD-R Iincopatability?


Maybe some one can help me out with this. I have an LG unit that I can record on and we tried watching the DVD-Rs on a friends Sanyo and also RCA units but, they don't load and play. We even tried our computers using Windows 7 and Windows 8 and the same thing the disc is not recognized.
What I have recorded is very valuable to me is there some way I at least can them transferred (if necessary) so that we can watch them on anything or what seems to be the problem? I could really use your help. Thanks
rsjm80
Will these disc's play on anything? I assume they play on the LG, but you don't actually say. Also, what format are the recorded files?
Did you remember to "Finalize" the DVD-Rs making them playable DVDs?
I thought you were talking about computer drives. If not, finalizing the disk is probably a good idea.
Does the file explorer in Windows show a list of the files that are on the DVD's?

Also, this data recovery program may be helpful.

Good luck. Regards,
-- Al
This from Wiki
This new format, among other things, resulted in DVD-R being unofficially referred to, in error, as DVD "minus" R. However, DVD "minus" R is not correct, according to DVD-R consortium recommendations; it is, in fact, a dash (i.e. DVD "dash" R). DVD-R and DVD+R technologies are not directly compatible, which created a format war in the DVD technology industry.

To reconcile the two competing formats, manufacturers created hybrid drives that could read both — most hybrid drives that handle both formats are labeled DVD±R and Super Multi (which includes DVD-RAM support) and are very popular.

I am not up enough on DVD to know if this could be a factor but something to look into.
It's possible to have DVD-R and DVD+R compatibility issues, but its very rare. If you set out to find a non compatible drive on purpose, it would be a difficult task.
I did finalize the discs, they are DVD-R. I also tried titling them with still no success, file explorer in Windows does not show or list them, they just won't read at all. Albert looks like you may have found the answer for me, as I feared that it may be a format difference and the only way around that would be to have them rerecorded (if that's even possible). Thank you all for the help and I can still give the data recovery program a shot too that might work so that I can get 'em to play on the TV.
Windows is not good for this type of thing. Download and burn a live Linux distro to a DVD. Live means you run the OS directly from your CD/DVD rom drive in your PC. It doesn't alter your computer in any way. When you are done, you remove the disc and reboot the computer, and everything goes back to the way it was. If you go to distrowatch.com, you can find hundreds of live distro choices. Pick one from the list of the top 100 you get to when you scroll down the home page a bit.

Unless you have a very old, first generation DVD drive, the chance of you having a problem with dvd- blanks is highly unlikely. They usually list the formats a drive is compatible with right on the face of the drive itself. If not just do a search for the model you have, and check the specs that way.
Rsjm80, we still need to know whether the discs are playable on the LG unit they were recorded on. If they are then it should certainly be possible to transfer the video to another device even if you have to connect the LG unit to another recorder. I have a DVD recorder that, in addition to the SP/LP/XP length options, includes a flexible (I think it's designated FR) mode that basically matches the compression to the length of the program being recorded. This uses the entire DVD while ensuring the best quality possible. The instruction warn that using this mode may make the DVD unplayable on other equipment.
I have an LG unit that I can record on and we tried watching the DVD-Rs on a friends Sanyo and also RCA units but, they don't load and play.
A stand alone LG DVD-R recorder box unit. Model Number?


I did finalize the discs
08-06-15: Rsjm80
But was it successful? If the FINALIZE was successful on the front display panel of the LG DVD recorder it will no longer read, display, DVD-R, it will read, display, DVD.

Also Djohnson54 brings up a good point on what speed did you use to record the DVD? Not all DVD players can read DVD-R discs. Especially if they were not recorded using the SP or LP mode setting on the DVD recorder.
.
OK, Jea48 Finalized disc did work because they play without a hitch on my deck. The deck is a combo of VHS & DVD LG model RC700N. Reading (the manual) the speed setting defaults to SP mode for recording, which I haven't changed, just that they won't play on others DVD players?
If you can now just rip the files somehow, your problem will be solved. Since you're already using Windows, download a free program called MakeMKV. I really don't like to use Windows for stuff like this, but this is pretty straight forward now that we know what you are dealing with.

So, if you can, try MakeMKV and I'm pretty sure you'll be able get your files into a state where you can use them as you wish. Even if it doesn't work, there are other programs you can try, but the one I listed is the easiest.

Finalized disc did work because they play without a hitch on my deck. The deck is a combo of VHS & DVD LG model RC700N.
08-06-15: Rsjm80

Rsjm80,

The disc does have to be "FINALIZED" to play back on DVD recorder it was made on. Did you check when you load the disc/s in the LG recorder if the front display panel says DVD or does it still say DVD-R? If it says DVD-R the disc/s is not finalized. The recorder does not automatically finalize the disc. The user has to command the recorder to finalize the DVD-R disc.
.
Yes, exercised the command to Finalize after each recording. It seems that the answer is that there is a conflict with the formats. I don't understand why the formats should be different for the makers of DVD-R, DVD-RW, I just want to be able to share these (for viewing purposes) with a friend of mine.
Rsjm80, Any idea what models the Sanyo and RCA units you tried it on are? I looked at the specs on your LG and, similar to my Toshiba, it reads and writes just about every format under the sun (except BluRay). I still think, if worst comes to worst, you should be able to hook the outputs from your machine to the inputs of another recorder and dub the disc so you don't lose your recording. As you probably don't have another recorder handy, you may have to find a service that does this. Many camera stores used to do this but they're a dying breed.
I don't see why you can't rip the disks and just re-burn them however you like.
I think in order to rip the discs they will have to be recognized by the computer. The OP mentioned that Windows 7 and 8 didn't recognize the discs but it's unclear to me whether this was a hardware issue or a software issue. If the problem is Windows Media Player and not the drive, I find that the Windows program VLC (VideoLAN) can play almost anything. It would be very unusual for any computer DVD drive to not recognize a DVD-R disc. They've been around for a long time.
Rsjm80,

I assume you do not own a Blu-ray universal player to try your recorded DVD-R disc/s in.

Just a suggestion you could take one of the DVD-Rs you recorded to a B&M box store and try the disc in a few different universal Blu-ray players and see if the problem is indeed the LG recorder recorded DVD-R disc/s. The problem could just be your friend's DVD players are not DVD-R compatible.

For what it is worth I have an old Panasonic DVD-R recorder that I have played recorded DVDs in 3 different model Sony DVD players. Played the same DVDs in two different Marantz Blu-ray universal players, and a cheapo Samsung Blu-ray universal player. No problems at all.
.
I did look at some of the specs for the LG players and found that it stated that they won't play on other units because the format is different! Now this sucks big time as I might or will have to search for another unit that will be compatible with what is so precious to me. I just thought that all the DVD layers had universal formats to play everything. Thank you everyone for your help and suggestions.
"08-07-15: Rsjm80
I did look at some of the specs for the LG players and found that it stated that they won't play on other units because the format is different! Now this sucks big time as I might or will have to search for another unit that will be compatible with what is so precious to me. I just thought that all the DVD layers had universal formats to play everything. Thank you everyone for your help and suggestions."

Your owners manual was printed in 2007. What may have been an odd format back then, may be more popular now. Either way, I don't see any other solution besides a computer. If you want your files back, you're going to have to use one. I know I sound like a broken record, but you did say your DVD's are very valuable to you. I would start off by installing VLC like one of the other posters said. Doing that will get a bunch of new codex's installed on your PC, which may allow the OS to recognize your DVD's. If so, then all you will need to do is transcode to a more suitable format. In the event VLC doesn't work, I can walk you through the process of downloading and using a live Linux distro. Its a fairly simple process.
Thank you , I'll be getting back to you concerning this at a little bit later time.

I did look at some of the specs for the LG players and found that it stated that they won't play on other units because the format is different!
08-07-15: Rsjm80

Rsjm80,

Please point out where it says that in the owners manual for a DVD-R or a DVD+R disc that is recorded in the Video mode and then Finalized.

LG RC700N owners manual
.
OK, I have to look, I have been real busy today with a car show, I'll get back to you on that but I found in the specs for one of the new LG units that IT DOES say that the format is different, it may not say that in my manual but I'll check again and let you know.
Rsjm80, After browsing through the manual (thanks for the link Jea48), I don't see any reason why the disc you recorded and finalized shouldn't be a "standard" DVD playable in other machines. The manual even states that at one point. Also, it doesn't appear that the non-standard recording length I mentioned above is even an option on your machine.

One thing I thought of while reading through the manual - if the program you recorded is that valuable to you, you can always use your machine to dub it to VHS. I know this is not optimal because of the loss of some quality but at least you would have the program. I'm also sure that you can find a service to create a DVD from the tape.

Dick
Jea48 & Djohnson54, I have searched the manual and cannot find that it states there could be format differences. I did find that in the newer LG recorders though. I even thought that maybe the recording mode was wrong but, the manual says that DVD-R discs always default to Video mode and as such they (in theory) should play in others. That's why it baffles me as to why it won't play on my friend's earlier Sanyo or the newer RCA surround unit. I thought that maybe the format selection might be wrong and be in VR mode but, since the DVD-Rs default I can't be wrong so it only comes down to a format difference then as now stated in the newer models.
Rsjm80, Frankly I'm baffled. This really should be straightforward. Maybe in the early days of DVD recording you might expect to find some drives that supported either +R or -R but not both but we are far removed from the early days and I've not seen a drive in many years that didn't support both. Best of luck in any case. Dick
"08-12-15: Djohnson54
Rsjm80, Frankly I'm baffled. This really should be straightforward. Maybe in the early days of DVD recording you might expect to find some drives that supported either +R or -R but not both but we are far removed from the early days and I've not seen a drive in many years that didn't support both. Best of luck in any case. Dick"

Unfortunately, if you are using component style burners, you can run into all kinds of problems. For example, finalizing isn't always the same thing for all formats. DVD+ auto finalizes as it records. The problem is that even after you finalize a dvd-, there will still be differences because they don't finalize the same way. Then there's the matter of patents. DVD+, DVD-, RW, etc.. Are all held by different companies. Because of that, manufacturers sometimes try to steer consumers into formats and/or equipment they make money on. That's probably the issue here. If we had enough info to follow the money, this would probably all make sense. And if that's not bad enough, I remember that there were marketing issues where companies were naming features DVD+(some feature), or DVD-(some feature), and they were not actually referring to supported formats.
"For example, finalizing isn't always the same thing for all formats."

Except that the manual that was linked above clearly states on page 23 that discs recorded on the unit should be playable on regular DVD machines.

From the manual:

Finalize
Finalizing ‘fixes’ the recordings in place so that the disc can be played on a regular DVD player or computer equipped with a suitable DVD-ROM drive. Finalizing a Video mode disc creates a menu screen for navigating the disc. This is accessed by pressing DISC MENU/LIST or TITLE.
"Except that the manual that was linked above clearly states on page 23 that discs recorded on the unit should be playable on regular DVD machines."

I agree. But that's not what's happening. lol. Also, don't read too much into my last post. When you said you were baffled, and this should be straightforward, I was just listing some of the odd, fine points with regards to the formats were talking about.

I think I did come up with something that I'm pretty sure no one else has mentioned. Dual layer (DL) disc's. They're so common now that support for them on an older player could be easily overlooked.
Yeah. I've never used a dual layer disc so I'm not sure how they would act.