Dubbing FM onto tape....

Ok...audiophiles...I am not only using 2 of the most maligned formats in the hi-end world...but making recordings as well! At any rate, any hints to making quality fm recordings? Have a good tuner, 3head deck, new chrome tape,mpx filter, nice interconnect,etc...have to say...the initial recordings i have made have been very impressive...would a new antennae make a difference?
Your 3 head monster might be fine and dandy but will it make cd copies, in other words will it record a cd onto tape and sound exactly like the cd, mine does. That is the secret.
If you can find 3M Black Watch metal tapes 4040. You'll get great recordings. If you are using any signal processors, you can hook up the tape in on the tape deck to the main out on your pre amp if you have more than one main out. Be careful not to overload the input on the recorder. Also the volume control on the preamp will adjust the record levels on the tape deck, so use caution.
2 biggest problems: FM compression and tape hiss. No way around the first, the second is mitigated with the right tape stock. Unfortunately, many of the tapes with the best response have more hiss. Maybe try a reel to reel tape recorder like a Revox.
Hello, what I USED to do, is
record off of the FM radio on
a hi-fi vcr. You get a MUCH better recording
and the signal to noise ratio
of MOST hi-fi vcrs is at around
The process that I used
AFTER that was, recording from FM radio
on to minidisc! Minidisc is GREAT for
editing any info, like track tiles, artists, etc.
I used to record off of the radio, but radio
is so bad where I live, you`re better off just
buying the cd`s, or exchanging cd`s with your friends
and burning them onto a cd-r.
Jvcvcrman08: I used to do a lot of that here in NYC where we have some amazing radio programs. However, it is very compressed. I agree about the hi-fi VCR, especially the ones from the early 90's.

The problem comes in when you make that digital transfer. I always lost something there, which is especially bad when what you have has FM compression to begin with. Better to stick with vinyl!
I would recommend starting with paying attention to your antenna, as a proper setup in this regard can make a huge difference in the clarity and stereo separation of the FM signal. I live in the S.F. Bay Area and use the outside roof TV (VHF/UHF) antenna with a new RG-6 quad shield coax drop to my receiver and get very good reception on most stations I care to listen to. A Magnum-Dynalab indoor antenna may work well if you do not have roof access. When you start with a strong/quiet FM signal you will capture a good quality recording on tape. Many FM stations have upgraded and are now simulcasting in HD (digital) radio and a side benefit is that their analog broadcasts sound better than ever.

There is still lots of great stuff on FM, at least in my area, to make putting some effort into good FM reception worthwhile. I've saved probably hundreds of $ on not buying scores of jazz cd's because I can tune to 91.1 KCSM and just enjoy the awesome variety for hours on end! -jz
A little late with this response, but here goes. 1) you need a good outside antenna with rotor if possible(Channel Master), 2) FM MPX filter, 3) Dolby noise reduction of any type. I use Dolby HX Pro & Dolby C (Denon DRS-810 Cassette Deck w/remote, Nakamichi RX-202), along with good audio tape. I use TDK SA & Pro SM. At minimum use chrome tapes. Tune your antenna for the station you want to record, keep the tape head clean, be sure to demag all components. With this set-up I have very little detectable hiss at very low volume, at higher volume settings hiss is non-existent. And HiFi VCRs make excellent audio recorders, plus you get at minimum 6 hours of tape time. The best VCRs are Sony model SLV-N900, last manufactured 2008, if you look around you might find some NOS. I still listen to a live recording I made in 1986 of UFO Live at the Cabaret in San Jose, Ca., on Radio KOME (long gone off the air). Good luck!
Don't touch that dial, there's KOME on it ;)