Does using a CD 'shine'/silicone product reduse the effect of CD degaussing?


The question originates from a person who had a better system, and whose opinion I trust. He mentioned in his experience, degaussing a CD made a large improvement in the sound of the CD on his system. Now I know he never treated the CDs with any shine or silicone product, nor painted any edges.
But in my experience, using a handheld tape head wand.. not much, if any difference. However I am always polishing my CDs. and silicone both sides, face and label!.
So.. the question is: does doing the silicone or other surface treatment reduce the need? or effect? of degaussing CDs? Thus with the polishing agent, the CD is no longer getting a static charge?
If you have any pertinent experience with either degaussing, or polishing or both.
My main wondering is would it be worth my while to ’try harder. IE buying a full size degausser? and try. Or does the fact I polish and silicone my CDs mean that there is less need (if any) for a degaussing?
Sadly I cannot edit the mis-spelt word reduse. in the header.. Yes it is reduce..
elizabeth
CD degaussing is one of those things that for me falls into the category of totally unlikely but too cheap not to try. Well thirty years ago when the Radio Shack Bulk Tape Eraser went for $20 that is!

Thought for sure I would be returning it in no time flat. Wrong. Dang thing totally worked. And yes it works on all CDs, polished or painted or otherwise. Cryo'd? Yes, even works on CDs that have been cryo'd. And yes I have copies of the same CD with and without cryo, or you name it. Hey, this was a long time ago! Way before I figured out what a waste CDs are and started putting it all into analog. So cut me some slack!

Now it turns out, what nobody mentions because they don't have my keen listening skills and auditory memory, the so-called "degaussing" is not only temporary, but begins losing effect within minutes. The loss is gradual and not huge but enough so that 10 or 15 minutes later if you pull one out and re-treat you will notice. I mentioned this to a friend who had bought one after me and he noticed the same thing once I pointed it out to him.

Now bulk demagnetizers are hard to come by and expensive. If it was just CDs I wouldn't recommend. But its not just cds! Mine is just as effective on LPs, and at least as effective on everything else.

What I mean by everything else, I start at one end of my system (L speaker, or R) and run the thing along the speaker cable, along the phono stage interconnect, to the phono leads, and motor controller umbilical, back along the power cords to the conditioner and the amp, then along to the other speaker. Whole thing takes about 60 seconds, which is good, because the Radio Shack is made for intermittent use and if it overheats goes into thermal shutdown for around 20 minutes. Just about right to do it all and will cool down while you play a side, but inconvenient if it shuts down before you complete the job.

And I know what you're thinking and yes indeed once again this is good for only a short time. Like with the CD it dissipates gradually and not a lot but enough so if I skip a side or two and do it again its better enough to be sure. 

This by the way is different than playing the demagnetizing tracks on the XLO test CD. Although I suspect the reason for most of the difference is the XLO tracks demag everything including internal speaker wiring, crossovers and yes even voice coils. Internal amp circuitry. Stuff I can't access with the demagnetizer. But running the XLO takes longer, and the sound, you don't want to be in the room. So I don't do it often. Demag and anti-static spray, I do almost every time, every side.

Worth it? Enough so I'm seriously considering buying another. With two I'd be less rushed, and able to do more, and have a backup in case one quits. Search around and if you find a better one (there is one similar on Amazon, might be even more powerful) let me know.


No. Electric static charge and magnetic field are separate issues.
Elizabeth,
Sorry I can't answer your question because I don't polish my cd's. However the old Bedini demagnetizer makes a noticeable improvement. What kind of polishing agent do you use?
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A CD's surface does not, IMO, need a coating of car wax or silicone---why build up a layer that could distort the "optics" of the reading?  Paper towels will leave fuzz on that coated surface and are also abrasive relative to the micro/nano-fiber towels that are safe for lenses and computer screens.  A demag process is all you need--and a fine bristle brush with a puff of air for dust particles.     
I've been doing some research since a recent thread was posted regarding CD cleaning. I must ask, why would a CD need to be demagnetised? The layer of metal contained in the disc is aluminum, which is nonmagnetic. 
   

lowrider573,097 posts04-10-2019 4:36amI’ve been doing some research since a recent thread was posted regarding CD cleaning. I must ask, why would a CD need to be demagnetised? The layer of metal contained in the disc is aluminum, which is nonmagnetic.

>>>>Yes, interesting, isn’t it? Well, to be fair, another angle is the ink used on the CD label might contain ferrous material. Or the aluminum layer could contain traces of ferrous metal. The same arguments can be made for using demagnetizers on interconnects, which do not contain ferrous material. All of those arguments seem a little weak and seem like grasping at straws. Anybody else got any ideas? Noto bene: I’m not saying demagnetizers don’t work, by the way. I’ve been using demagnetizers since like forever for CDs, headphone cables, interconnects. Gee, could I have been the victim of overly zealous audiophile behavior? 😳

Pop quiz Pt. 1 - Are 24 carat gold CDs amenable to demagnetizers?

Pt 2 - Are CD-ROMs - without ink on their labels - amenable to demagnetizers?

Pt 3 - Why are the colors of the ink used for CD labels bad for the sound aside from possible magnetic effects? Gee, I wonder if the reason copies of CDs oft sound better than the originals is because CD-ROMs don’t have ink on the label.
OK @geoffkait , so there are some possibilities for a magnetic charge.

Next, as you have stated many times, the chance of stray reflections by the laser exists on the top side of the disc. Does applying a coating of a conditioner on the label side reduce this effect? Or is using a green marker on the sides of the disc the recommended treatment? 

   
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owrider573,098 posts04-10-2019 10:35amOK @geoffkait , so there are some possibilities for a magnetic charge.

Next, as you have stated many times, the chance of stray reflections by the laser exists on the top side of the disc. Does applying a coating of a conditioner on the label side reduce this effect? Or is using a green marker on the sides of the disc the recommended treatment?

>>>What I say is the stray light is caused by the laser bean striking the physical “diffraction grating” produces by the nanoscale “data” represented by the nanoscale pits and lands on the CD. The scattered light fills up the compartment of the CD transport like a light bulb. It’s kind of a long story, but to compress the story a lot, the Green Pen absorbs the red portion of the scattered laser light. But most of the scattered light is not (rpt not) red, but invisible. Machina Dynamica’s NEW DARK MATTER absorbs both visible red light and invisible infrared light. Recall the laser CD is near infrared 780 nm.
There is a thread in the digital forum devoted to this New Dark Matter topic. Geoff goes through this explanation on page 5 or so.
Hey, celander, my comments here transcend NDM. Go moderate somebody else. 
Wind turbulence?  Doubtful that would exist as a factor.  Apply a film like wax or silicone, spin that disc at 200-400 RPM, and what does the laser "see"? You would have to bet on "as good" or "better". It looks fine to you, holding it in your hand, but the laser may be seeing a mess---a hazy window at that speed.  Better to play the disc as is.  Also, I wonder why you would use a cheapo disc carousel as a transport when you have a better player? Whatever suits you.....  
I suspect some CD treatments like the Nanotch 8500 Liquid with shark oil reduces laser light scattering on the surface of the polycarbonate. You know, by filling in the microscopic crevices and holes. Nanotech you may recall was the inventor of the Nespa Stobe “Light Cannon” tweak for CDs. Maybe car waxes, etc. Japanese SHM discs employ a clear plastic layer with better optical transparency than polycarbonate. The trick is not to change the refractive index too much since it and all the CD geometry has been pre-determined.
Thanks @geoffkait . It makes sense to me when explained that light can be scattered around the transport compartment due to imperfections in the polycarbonate.