Does room size affect volume and bass?


I listened to a pair of Sonus Faber Electa Amatour II, I love them, only one problem, when I have one of my Reference Recordings with the Dallas Wind Symphony on, when it is playing loud, like around 90 DB and the bass drum cracks the speaker cone reaches excusion. This was at my dealers room which is 4 times the volume of my 19x13x8 room. He said that if the speakers were in my room playing at the same volume, they probably wouldn't hit the cone excersion. What do you think?
bigcigarman
Your question is somewhat confusing, but if I have interpreted it correctly, your dealer is wrong. A smaller room should attain higher volume levels than a larger room for the same power input. Also cone excursion is independent of room volume and is only a factor of power input. Hope this helps.
Onhwy69 - I think the dealer's room was bigger which would make him correct. I also agree that a larger amp would be necessary in the dealer's room - esp. if 90db is the norm for equipment auditions! Wow - don't want to buy floor model speakers from that guy!
I meant that the dealer said I wouldn't have to use as much power in my room to play at the same levels as in his showroom, therefore if I wasn't using as much power to get the SPL I wouldn't make the cone hit its excersion. Sound correct?
You mean that I meant the dealer said that?
I was speaking on your behalf but I know what your talking about
Who let Cybil out ???
Ignore that dealer, he is dead wrong. The room's volume has ZERO to do with cone excursion. Only if the speaker is receiving less power from the amp, will the cone have less excursion. If you are actually playing the speaker quiter, but the SPL at the listening seat is similar to the higher power in the vary large room (because you're closer, and the room is smaller) only then will the cone move less. I build speakers...
QED: Room volume affects power necessary to produce desired SPL hence cone excursion, indirectly, but most certainly.
Incidently, the size of the room will affect the bass simply because of its dimensions, because a 40Hz tone, which so many claim to produce, has a wavelength of nearly 30ft.
IN DEALING WITH ROOM SIZE, ACOUSTICAL PROPERTIES OF THE SPEAKER AND WHETHER THE ROOM IS A SOFT OR HARD ROOM PLAY A CRITICAL PART, NOT JUST THE SIZE OF THE ROOM. HIGH FREQUENCY ROLLOFF AND SOUND ABSORBING ROOMS CAN CREATE HAVIC. CEILING HEIGHTH SUCH AS HIGH VAULTED CEILINGS CAN EAT UP SINE WAVE ENERGY AND LOSE SOME OF THE EFFECTS OF THE AUDIO PROGRAM IN THE SOUND REPRODUCTION. THIS IS ESPECIALLY TRUE IN REFERENCE TO THE PROGRAM MATERIAL YOU USED. A PARAMETRIC EQ AND SOUND ANALYIZER CAN TELL YOU IF YOU ARE MISSING OUT.
Bass frequencies can still be perceived accurately in smaller rooms, whether or not the room supports the full wavelength. Bass waveforms do not have to be a "travelling wave" in order to be accurately reproduced.
Carl is absolutely correct. However, the best 40Hz tone I ever heard (electronically) came from standing 27.86 feet from a big Krell pushing a big speaker in a big room!!
Since we are on the subject, if given a choice, how would you position speakers in a half catheral ceiling room? Highest ceiling height above the listener or the opposite? I have two different opinions from speaker designers. Would a half catheral ceiling be desireable as compare to a 8 ft or 10 ft flat ceiling?
Lets not get too technical.A speaker fed identical signal level will produce the same output, but the room will make a big difference, just as where you position speakers does. A small speaker that sounds thin and bright in a large room can be transformed by moving to a smaller room. Low tech demo: pick up your jam-box and walk around the house, it sounds like your changing the volume as you move closer to walls and into smaller areas. Thats why setting up speakers can be so difficult. As always try it in your room .I have heard speakers that would not play bass-lines in my room, sound fine in larger rooms. Try before you buy.