Do you let the turntable spin when putting down record and attach the clamp.


Either turn off table between each record side,
or keep it turned on - unscrew the clamp, put record down, clamp and play record.

Thank you.
dcaudio
Is there a difference between turning it off, stopping the motor, and stopping it spinning? On mine that is three different things. I could stop the platter spinning without stopping the motor, let the platter spin with the motor off, turn the whole thing off while the platter spins..... Only thing for sure is everything including turntables sounds worse after being turned off, so I would never do that. But I would bet that by off you mean stop not off. Or do you?
dc, historically I never turned the turntable off until the end of the session. The record weight I have used for decades was just placed on the spindle. It was not a clamp or screw on job. This has to change now as I have a new turntable coming which has vacuum clamping. I think I do not have a choice. You have to stop the turntable to change sides.
No, the platter is stopped when putting on or taking off a record. When the clamp is attached, the platter is turned slowly to make sure the clamp is tightened correctly. After playing a record, the arm is moved to the safe position, and the clamp is removed as the platter spins down.

I try to help the platter start up by gently spinning the platter.  I use reduced voltage to operate the table and it won't start at that low voltage without some help.  I use a Variostat to manage the voltage for ~ 70v operation (VPI motor). 
The power is aways on.
One cannot fasten a reflex clamp without stopping the rotation.
Reset AT pickup, place record, place clamp, brush diamond with Stylast. Give clamp a spin (to save the belt from dead start on a heavy platter), hit the on swittch and drop.
Rinse and repeat.
If your turntable is delt-drive you can damage it this way.

If it’s Direct Drive you can’t damage it, and you can change record and add/remove disc stabilizer on top of the record on the fly (with spinning platter if you like).

I press the stop button each time I change record. I put my disc stabilizer on the spinning platter (after I turn it on, not before). But I use ONLY direct drive turntables.

I don't think I want to attempt putting the periphery ring clamp on my VPI while it's spinning. With my direct drive turntables, I leave the power on but stop the platter from spinning when I change records.
Platter is always spinning for the session. No clamps or weights. 
Post removed 
Since for a DD turntable, there is no momentary sound quality degradation associated with operating the on/off switch, I do off my DD turntables between LPs. For any of the ones I own, they are back up to speed in seconds after re-start. I use a SOTA reflex clamp on 3 of the 4 DDs, so I feel the need to have the platter stationary for changing LPs, anyway. My Lenco is under control of a Phoenix Engineering Eagle power supply and Roadrunner tach. The motor is controlled at the Roadrunner, and it only takes a push-push of a tiny button to stop and start it. So there too I shut down the motor between LPs.  Thus ends yet another exciting topic for me.
When they use to Q up a record on a broadcast TT. The motor was shut down. The record was "Q ed" and then flip the motor back on. They stayed on, you flip them off,  then Q UP, normally 2 TT run all the time.

Within 1/2 a revolution the TT is up to speed. Russco, Sparta, QRK, Collins, Fairchild, Roberts. It is a actual test for BOTH, broadcast and transcription type TT

The transcriptions TT had a brake, it stopped the platter top plate but the the motor never stops.. release the brake and away you go.

Little motors like the Garrard and Thoren, didn’t do well if you turn them off. It takes 5-10 min for them to really stabilize. Still 1/2 to 3/4 turn, they should be up to speed after the eddie brake is released and they are warmed up.

I keep a cool 6-12 Broadcast TT around. Fun to fix up and they last forever. Gear Shifters.. YUP They have gear shifters.. Reminds me of my old 45, Stick shift and a foot clutch..

Regards
Keep it running. Put record on, screw clamp. Reverse. 

G
Actually, starting and stopping a belt drive repetitively probably does more harm than just letting it run. Direct Drive turntables are impervious to just about anything, their one major advantage in home use. Unless you are slip queuing records torque is not that important. I know, gives a turntable better pace and timing blah, blah, blah.
To bad nobody makes a DD table with an adequate suspension and vacuum clamping with a platter thick enough to keep the cartridge away from the motor. Why would anyone want to market a new turntable? Vinyl will be dead in just a few short years:-) 
Whenever you que up a record with the platter spinning, with or without a clamp/weight, you increase your chance of an accident. 
To bad nobody makes a DD table with an adequate suspension and vacuum clamping with a platter thick enough to keep the cartridge away from the motor

Obviously you know nothing about reference Direct Drive turntables. Some of them are suspended like Luxman PD-444, some have vacuum pump and specially designed platter like Victor TT-801 and others.

If someone really need suspended DD they could buy isonoe feet here.

Some reference superheavy direct drive have built-in springs like this. 

What DD do you have in mind when you post bad things about DD in general?

What about chain drive tables? Personally the rattling bugs me. Also, I have an ancient but simple Linn Basik/Akito and turn it off when changing records, especially since I use a Mitchell "Rega" clamp. It runs perfectly and should continue doing so well into the next couple of decades, although I do need to replace the cueing damping fluid...that's #497 on my list of things to do, and I'm only up to 12.
Whenever you que up a record with the platter spinning, with or without a clamp/weight, you increase your chance of an accident.

If one can't change records and cue the tonearm with a rotating platter, one should probably stick to seedees.
 
I imagine these are the same people we see driving around alone in a car wearing a face diaper.

Oz



If one can't change records and cue the tonearm with a rotating platter, one should probably stick to seedees.
 
I imagine these are the same people we see driving around alone in a car wearing a face
Based on your avatar and comment, one can assume that you’re a night club DJ, therefore, I bow to your experience 






Based on your avatar and comment, one can assume that you’re a night club DJ, therefore, I bow to your experience

Hmm, I detect that you might be a tad facetious.

So let me posit in this manner. Do you stop the platter, lift the arm, take off the record, put on a new record, place the stylus in the groove, then start the platter? Every time?

Because that is the way the OP suggests it is the safest. If you agree, please feel free to let us know.


And while you are at it, please expound on how you made the connection between my profession and my avatar. I'd really like to hear that too.

Oz



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=guaHxZz8JnI

This guy has been around a while.. He use to have every part under the sun for the these Broadcast TT.

Regards


@noromance 

Platter is always spinning for the session. No clamps or weights.

I understand, but do you not worry even a little about scuffing up your vinyl during that moment of slippage when lifting the record off the moving platter.  I realize the musical information is down in the grooves but still, it concerns me. 
Do you have a trick in the routine that helps?
My TT stays on while the belt is stopped and I don’t believe the motor cools off enough between sides to make a difference, although I could of course be wrong about that.  I generally let it spin for awhile before dropping into the first side.  
So, @dcaudio, I’ve tried both ways and for me on my rig it’s just a question of patience.  If I stop the motor it takes the platter a couple of minutes to wind down if I don’t help it slow down.  Moreover, after a start, and again if I don’t help, it takes the platter at least a cup of coffee or a side of fries to get up to 33.  But, if I flip a record on the fly I almost always worry about scuffs.  Therefore, you’re not the only one with the question and thank you for asking it.  
Never TT should be stopped  when using clamp.