Do Audiophile Cables Matter? Here's PROOF!


I seriously doubt that this will make any difference to the naysayers. But here it is.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DC0s6KqQz3g
artemus_5
well said.... My best....

There are two separate issues here.

The video demonstrates clearly that cables differently constructed allow/don't allow stray in, acting/not acting as antenna.

What it doesn't demonstrate is how a poorly constructed cable acting as an antenna and transmitting an audio signal deleteriously affects that signal.

Cables do matter.. Only price does little on how good the cable is or how they perform.. People are fooled all the time thinking the more you spend the better it is (for the most part).. Its the design of the cable that matters most..  Start with Mogami cables and use them as a reference when trying to upgrade.. Check out their measurements..  Follow their path.. 
The featured test has nothing to do with audio. It measures a relative inductance of the tested cables while dealing with ~100Mhz frequency and ~500uV signal level. Please make a few tight coils (around a pencil?) on the first tested cable (near the receiver input) and you will see a significant drop of the signal level due to a high-frequency choke you just created.
My experience is clear: cables do matter but they also never act alone. Do you want to hear a cable difference? Use two clearly different sounding tracks (from two different recording studios) and two different audio cables to compare using a good-quality A/B switch. There is a good chance they will sound different, but not necessarily on both of those recordings.
I've noticed a statistically significant difference in the 2 cable camps:

1. naysayers are almost always engineers, either professionally or via years of hands-on experience in labs, studios, etc.  They understand intrinsically the scientific method as well as bias.  They can also read scopes.

2..  "audiophile cable" supporters are rarely technical and have no formal training in engineering or the technical sciences, e.g., doctors, lawyers, accountants, business persons, and other generally hard workers that didn't have to go thru the pain of 30-page-long mathematics equations.  They may be able to argue the merits of any amendment or perform a cardiac bypass but you ask them to program the clock on a VCR and you've essentially found their kryptonite.