Dissapointed with import LPs.....

I recently bought the following used import lps:
Montrose(debut)-German pressing
Meatloaf-Bat out of Hell-dutch pressing. First off, i wasn't seeking import selections as these happened to be extremely clean copies for fair prices. However, sonically Im a bit underwhelmed. Bat out of Hell has very little bass and the Montrose LP has nowhere near the clarity of my original US pressing(albeit far quieter). Am I missing something? Others seem to rave about import vinyl but these purchases have left me gun shy about future import lps. I also have a Nazareth LP on PHillips(German) label that is a far cry from my original domestic release. ALso, these pressings seem a bit flimsy weigh wise. Any thoughts?
Are these imports digital re-releases of Montrose and Meatloaf or the original analogue pressings from the 70s? (analogue import vs. domestic?)

It only takes one pass with a worn-out cartridge to ruin ANY record. Import of otherwise.

Second, most records are 'bass shy' anyway.. Nature of the beasts.

Third, A lot depends on who has the mater tapes. Usually if the band recorded in the USA, no way will the owning company send the original tapes to Europe. And same thing other way round'.
So if they recorded in Europe, then buy the EU copy. If in the USA, buy the USA copy.

Finally, mastering is done when an album is cut to the machine. Each engineer has their own ideas of what is right. Some just give what is on the tape. Some goose it to their own tastes.. It is always a crapshoot.
(cut to the machine is my stupid way of saying made into a master to make the vinyl. I cannot think of the right word)

So like a Led Zep with "RL" (Robert Ludwig) in the dead wax... or not. (The RL Led Zep vinyls are highly sought after... PLENTY were not mastered by him, and do not sound as good.)
I used to buy nothing but "Made in UK" records back in the 70s and 60s because they sounded so much better to my ears than US pressings. They seemed less processed, less equalized. Today, I don't see that much difference in CDs that are made in other countries, i.e. Japan, even the UK. I do recall feeling disappointed at records made in Germany so I stayed away from them after that. I was probably unknowingly following Elizabeth's advice because so many of my favorite artists were from the UK, and recorded there.
Thanks everybody...I have to respectfully disagree with most lps being bass insufficient...at least on regards to 70s classic rock...true going used has its risks...but there definitely appears to be correlation between the import copies and poor fidelity...these were all.original era pressings...the flimsy construction should have Bern a give away...buyers be aware..not all imports are desirable...someare fools gold
You should have a look at Japanese pressings.

My experience has been great with these. The vinyl is really black in color, the LPs are super flat, the spindle hole is always dead center and the sound qulaity is great! I buy these locally in my area.
I generally dont seek out imports as they are often overpriced IMHO...however...if I come across a Japanese Beatles,Floyd, etc...might bite!....who knows....
I have also found late 60s and 1970s classic rock to have plenty of deep bass. I also agree with Elizabeth's findings; a band recorded in the US is not going to have a better import pressing. But I have multiple copies of British bands where the German/Holland pressing is excellent, US version is poor, and Japanese pressing is vastly superior.
If the country of the original recording was the quality determining factor why would japanese Beatle LPs command such high prices? My belief is that every country has/does make good and bad LPs often of the same title.There are many steps involved in the process,many things can go just right or so wrong.I am leery of LPs that "seem a bit flimsy weightwise".I just listened to an English Bell pressing of Mountain (Well I made it through Mississippi Queen anyway)that was superior to my american Windfall original.Not lacking for Bass in any way shape or form.Felix Pappalardi though generally made himself heard.