different people may hear the same sound differently...


This is quite interesting....

https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode/b28f6090-980c-4a4c-883e14005921bd91/#:~:text=Neurons%20in%20the%20brain%27s%20hearing,Cynthia%20Graber%20reports.
 

"Neurons in the brain’s hearing center reacted differently to the same sounds in different test subjects--so different people may hear the same sound differently. Cynthia Graber reports.

Our ears are highly attuned to sounds in the world around us. It’s not just the frequency of the sound itself. There are also subtle differences and shifts in loudness and pitch. That’s what tells us, for instance, whether that baby crying belongs to us and just where it’s located. But according to a recent study, what you and I hear may not sound the same.

Scientists at the University of Oxford are trying to understand how the ears and the brain work together. They fit ferrets with auditory implants, trained them to respond to sound, and then looked at the way their neurons reacted. It turns out that each ferret’s neurons in the auditory cortex responded to changes in gradual differences in sound ­ but each ferret responded differently.

The researchers say this is applicable to humans. They say this means that our brains are wired to process sounds depending on how our ears deliver that sound. So if you suddenly heard the world through my ears, it might sound quite different. The scientists say this research could help in the quest to design better hearing aids and speech recognition systems

Neurons in the brain’s hearing center reacted differently to the same sounds in different test subjects--so different people may hear the same sound differently. Cynthia Graber reports.

Our ears are highly attuned to sounds in the world around us. It’s not just the frequency of the sound itself. There are also subtle differences and shifts in loudness and pitch. That’s what tells us, for instance, whether that baby crying belongs to us and just where it’s located. But according to a recent study, what you and I hear may not sound the same.

Scientists at the University of Oxford are trying to understand how the ears and the brain work together. They fit ferrets with auditory implants, trained them to respond to sound, and then looked at the way their neurons reacted. It turns out that each ferret’s neurons in the auditory cortex responded to changes in gradual differences in sound ­ but each ferret responded differently.

The researchers say this is applicable to humans. They say this means that our brains are wired to process sounds depending on how our ears deliver that sound. So if you suddenly heard the world through my ears, it might sound quite different. The scientists say this research could help in the quest to design better hearing aids and speech recognition systems."

—Cynthia Graber

kuribo

“Beauty is in the eye of the beholder “

Probably the same for the ear too……

We each ’build up’ our hearing and visual and touch senses independently, with a common frameworks supplied by our individually derived and shaped biological package..

The ideas behind IQ are also in the ideas behind EQ, Ear-Q or Hearing Quotient.

To not let those who hear with their own sense training and native ability level (before, during and after basic training of that sense) dictate reality to those who literally hear differently, and at different levels of quality and native/learned hearing abilities.

Ie, the age old problem of: "I am dumb, therefore - you cannot be smart. and I’ll attack you with full-on unrelenting idealized righteousness-if you say different."

Nor is it possible to lay the desire to finalize some measuring structure/method/set of this whole issue of differences, at the feet of measurement. People want final answers to they can act on them and grow into the next problem, or for the tribe to feel ’safe’.

Regarding audio.. measurement of the meaning and context of said measurement has not been fully established as of yet, and may never be.

 

The enabled zipperhead army problem, come to life in the world of audio. A very commonly utilized methodology in other arenas, like politics and religion. In audio it has no real centralized head of manipulation but forms such anyway, in websites and forums that use this as a central motif--- which illustrates it exists as a central mechanic in the body or subconscious/unconscious mental pattering of the human body as a carrier of intellect. A major component of the fundamentals of tribalism.

Some (as of recent) call it mass formation psychosis, in a negative context but it also has positive qualities with regard to humans having societies and cultures that work for the betterment of all. Since all of us are not at the same level of mental and physical capacities (that pesky individualism thing! "why can’t we all just be identical corralled animals?", cried the totalitarian version of Rodney King), it is subject to manipulation by various individuals and parties. The audio world is no different in such aspects.

In the end, the unherdable individual cats that escape the bag, are the only thing that saves us from the doom of being a boxed animal.

Celebrate the individual who makes your life difficult. If they aren’t there, everything you love and know and want for the world --dies. Forever.

I sang in any number of choirs back in the day. Very experienced choir master who had been testing choir members for pitch and vocal range mentioned I had perhaps the most perfect pitch she had ever observed. To this day, bothers me to no end when I hear off pitch singing, US National Anthem must be difficult to get pitch right.

 

I've always believed I heard music differently from others, many can tolerate as background, I become distracted. Engages  and opens up my neural transmitters and pathways, assume theirs very constricted. Funny thing is high quality sound doesn't much engage their neural transmitters or pathways either.