Dielectric grease and tubes


Is there any benefit of using dielectric grease on the pins of tubes?
last_lemming
NO! Don't use it!
I wouldn't think you'd want to use dielectric grease since its sole purpose is to prevent the conductance of electricity.
Check. Won't use it. The only reason I thought of it was because when you install spark plug wires you dab a bit on the electrical connections prior to installing them. Didn't know if there was a similar use here.
"The only reason I thought of it was because when you install spark plug wires you dab a bit on the electrical connections prior to installing them."

I know that a lot of people do this but its not really a good thing to do. You don't want to but a grease that's job is not to conduct electricity between to conductors. Your getting away with it because electricity is still managing to flow, in spite of the grease. The grease is used to stop corrosion and deterioration of electrical contacts. Make the contact first and then seal it with dielectric grease. When you do it that way, it works just like a regular piece of wire with a solid dielectric. Please keep in mind here that I am talking about using dielectric grease on cars, not audio equipment. Don't use it on audio gear. (Unless you get the stuff made specifically for high end audio applications.)
Battery grease is what your talking about. Its used for corrosion on DC powerplant connections, and is conductive.
Dielectric grease is used on non-conducting parts of electrical assemblies to block stray current. The pins of tubes need the best possible contact with the tube socket and dielectric grease couldn't do anything but hinder that.
Why wouldn't it work to stop mini-arcing? I thought this was the benefit of dielectric grease as well as one of the causes of poor sound from wall plug connections.
Its non conductive so if it doesn't completely wipe off the pins as they enter the tube socket you might lose the tube. Its also only soluble in methyl ethyl keytone and mineral spirits. I do use it on the pins of my trailer socket of my truck with success. I should probably only use it on the rubber gasket but you have to be careful because it can break down silicon rubber.
There should be no arcing on any tube socket if it is in good condition and no grease is needed.

Some sockets can be damaged by arcing caused by a failure of the tube, if this happens the grease will not protect anything.
"Battery grease is what your talking about. Its used for corrosion on DC powerplant connections, and is conductive."

That's something else. Dielectric grease is used for corrosion but is not conductive. Like you say, though, you can get grease that is conductive.

"There should be no arcing on any tube socket if it is in good condition and no grease is needed.

Some sockets can be damaged by arcing caused by a failure of the tube, if this happens the grease will not protect anything."

Good answer. Unless your stereo system says Ford or Chevy on it, best to leave your system ungreased.

"Don't use it on audio gear. (Unless you get the stuff made specifically for high end audio applications.)"

That's just me being a smart ass. Pay no attention to it. There really is no audiophile grade dielectric grease (That I know of). Sorry if I confused anyone.
Also, over many years a tube socket my lose it's insulation properties and have to be replaced because the tube socket itself is arcing.