Dedicated Line for my home theatre newbie


I see lots of threads but want to double check with all the folks on here for help with my idea to put a dedicated line in. So, I have a simple system that consists of a 55" Plasma, NAD Reciever, Denon DVD-2910 and Monster HTS-3600. The room is directly above the garage which is going to be finished off later this month. Before I get the insulation, drywall up I wanted to run a dedicated line from the main panel to my media room directly above. I was thinking of Romex 10/2 wire but the electrician is saying that is too big for my panel and he suggests 12/2. Does this sound right? Or is he just being lazy because it maybe harder to work with? Planning on using a PS Audio outlet that says it can accept either 12A or 15a. I might go ahead and grab a hubbell Hospital grade that folks here say are good bang for the money. Trying to keep costs down. Let me know your thoughts. Thanks.
hricikda
I was thinking of Romex 10/2 wire but the electrician is saying that is too big for my panel and he suggests 12/2. Does this sound right?

LOL, that's funny, LOL..... Too big for the panel.

I would have at least 2 dedicated branch circuit lines installed.

If the runs are short 12-2 with ground is fine.

Make sure the electrician installs the new dedicated branch circuits on the same leg, line, in the panel.
All on L1 or all on L2.

Regardless whether the electrician installs #10 or #12 wire he will still feed each of them from a single pole 20 amp breaker. 20 amp branch circuit.
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I have two dedicated outlets for my 2 channel rig. I'm not sure about the cost/value for HT. in my HT, I did upgrade the cheap outlets to the best P & S I could buy locally. My HT goes through an APC H15 which also regulates the voltage. Have system similar to yours except for a couple of subs too.
I also installed 2 dedicated lines for my 2-channel. Go with the 10-gauge. Using a bigger section won't be hazzardous in any way. Your electrician might be thinking you are wasting money, or might be lazy, as you say.

I suggest you go ahead and get 2 dedicated lines. The labor to have 2 instead of 1 is not twice as much, and it is generally accepted that keeping digital and analog on different circuits is better. You don't want this itch in 6 months...then it will cost you more!
So, I had the electrician come out yesterday. The installed 1-20amp line to my audio room(12/2 romex and PS Audio Power Port) and 1 line to my small computer/peachtree audio system. The electrician also ran another line downstairs for future use (just in case I wanted it).

Ok, here is the meat of the post..... Impressions....
I wanted a dedicated line in hopes for a better signal and noticed that when I turn the ceiling fan on with the remote I hear a small poping sound from my speakers??? WTF....How could this be. I did watch him install the wire and did notice when he went to hook up the wires to the panels he seemed to remove a lot of the yellow sheilding to allow for the copper ground to be hooked up. Any thoughts on if this is normal or should I get him back over and look at it? Thanks
I did watch him install the wire and did notice when he went to hook up the wires to the panels he seemed to remove a lot of the yellow sheilding to allow for the copper ground to be hooked up.

The outer yellow jacket is not a shield. It is just an outer PVC jacket to house the three conductor and help protect the the insulated conductors from physical damage.

I wanted a dedicated line in hopes for a better signal and noticed that when I turn the ceiling fan on with the remote I hear a small poping sound from my speakers???

If you are 100% sure the fan never caused that problem before call the electrician back out......

Possibilities?

While the electrician was in the panel he may have disturbed, moved, some wires where they terminate on the neutral buss as well as the branch circuit breakers.

Solid wire that is not curled around a terminal screw and then secured by a tightened down the screw, (in most cases the wire is straight and the terminal tightened down on the straight wire). In the latter case movement of the wire can cause the connection to become lose sometimes.

Another thing that can happen in the case of plug in breakers, such as Square D QO breakers, a breaker/s may not be fully seated on the buss connecting tie.

One of the above examples could be the case with the branch circuit that feeds the ceiling fan.....
If a connection is loose the connection can series arc under a start up load condition and settled down when the load drops off.

Or you just never noticed the problem before.

At any rate call the electrician and explain the problem you are experiencing.

I am sure he will come back out and check and re tighten all the wire terminations in the panel.
He will also check to make sure all branch circuit breakers are plugged onto the buss connecting ties all the way.
Thanks so much Jea48
Sounds like he tapped into an existing circuit..
Ok, I'm a dummy. I realized that I hooked up the system minus the subwoofer to the new line. I came home last night I unplugged the sub and plugged it in the new line and the noise went away.

Update on the system: My wife and I were watching her show :) American Idol and she even commented on how it sounded more in your face and clearer. There were a few occasions that we heard sounds that we though were our dog playing with his bone when in fact it was people in the background in the audience. Pretty amazing what a dedicated line can do. I'm a believer....Plus, it only cost me $60 for 3 dedicated lines plus materials.