Current Faves that "Swing"?


Which CD players do you think allow that "swing" factor that Count Basie is so famous for to shine through? I have the Cambridge 840C, and it really IS a terrific player, but it is also a bit rhythmically slow, so a waltz doesn't quite have that ONE-two-three, ONE-two-three rhythm. In contrast, my old JVC XL Z-1010TN and 1050TN do swing in spades (and so does my Rega Apollo).
And, of course, we must allow that some other component in our system also doesn't "swing" as much, such as anything that inhibits microdynamics, or has too much grain between notes, thereby slowing our sense of swing. But lets just allow that you could upgrade that compnent that has grain, or that inhibits the "swing factor."
What are your choices?
By the way, if you know what the component is that inhibits the swing a little, mention it. In my case, it would be one of my speakers, the Usher 718s. NOT the BE version, the original one. Between the Cambridge and the Usher, "swing" isn't quite as evident, as say an old pair of Mirage 490s, which swing like heck.
gbmcleod
In my experience, Naim and Ayre CDP's earn top marks for "swing". Those two brands have quite different overall presentations, so you might prefer one over the other, but they both get that toe tapping!
I have the Cambridge 840C, and it really IS a terrific player, but it is also a bit rhythmically slow, so a waltz doesn't quite have that ONE-two-three, ONE-two-three rhythm.

LOL - rhythm cannot be adjusted. A more dynamic system will allow the accents to stand out more - this can increase the sensation of swing. HOweverm it mostly boils down to the speakers - tight criticaly damped designs with internally damped drivers will swing (preserve microdynamics or musician's emphasis/accents best). Avoid drivers that ring and underdamped designs with a bass hump - they will tend to plod along rather than swing energetically. If you think about the drum set tuning/sound that swing drummers tend to use (as opposed to rock drummers) and you will get the idea - go for speakers that are that way too - tight and lean sound.
Ayre CX-7e will do exactly what you want.
if the disc swings, the hardware will to.
Here is another vote for Naim which is known for its PRaT.
I wouldn't say that the disc determines the sound, Jaybo. I would say that the hardware, to use a common phrase, 'gets out of the way' and allows the disc to shine through.
Shadorne's comment is, of course, quite right: dynamics, both micro and macro, determine the "swing." It is fascinating that the JVC allows as much of the micro to pass through as some more contemporary components.
I don't pretend to have the knowledge of the above posters and speak mostly from experience .

Given that , I acquired an AA Prima CDP that replaced a NAD top of the line model . Right off I noticed a difference in PRaT on music that I have been familiar with for over 25 years ! No other equipment changes were made . Some passages seemed slower than what I had been used to hearing over the years from a variety of different sources and systems .

This anomoly was consistant through system changes that included speakers , cables and amplification . It wasn't until I changed CDP's that the PRaT situation went back to be what I had always heard through the years before the Prima . I have been told by a couple of other Prima owners that they heard the same PRaT anomoly .

Just my observations . No flames please .

Good luck .