Classical, Jazz, or Rock?

Pink Floyd has finally come out on SACD, The Stones a couple months back.

For some reason the record companies believe all audiophiles listen to Classical music exclusively. When they launch a new Audiophile format like SACD, the think all the people who buy these high-end rigs are Classical music lovers.

My question is, of these three, Classical, Jazz, or Rock?
In your collections, which is the Dominant choice, which one do you own the most recordings in.

Thanks for you comments and input.
Rock, classical and jazz covers approx. 500 albums (out of a total of 3500 CD's and LP's). A guestimate is that 50 of the 500 are R&R, 350 are classical and 100 are jazz. The other 3000 albums would then be "other" music.
You act like there is only 3 kinds of music.There are
hundred of musical artforms,Why don"t you open up your
ears to some of them!
Why don"t YOU read the question.
I'm sure that Rockinroni knows that there are more than "3" kinds of music.
" Why don"t you open up your ears to some of them!"

Man you're RUDE!!!
You guys might wanna' try getting in touch w/ Vince McMahon. Might be a really good schtick for the WWF (or is it WWE now?).
Started out w/ Hendrix, Who, Cream, Stones... Got hooked. Got into just about any other mind altering stuff I could find. Rehab is not an option.
The category thing has some usefulness I guess, but it seems like most really interesting or compelling recordings don't neatly fit into one of the big three categories. Gun to the head answer:
20% Rock
40% Jazz
10% Classical
30% Other

PS It seems like alot of of recordings that don't have any kind of "audiophile" packaging assigned to them sound better than many SACDs, HDCDs and XRCDs.
Rock/Pop 20%
Hip Hop 20%
Dance 15%
Soul/R&B 15%
Psychedelia 15%
Other 15%
Like Ive suggested many times before:
1) download KazaaLite
2) download music youve read about in music magazines
3)if you like it go out and buy the album
4) if you dont like it delete it from your harddrive.
Classical- 30%
Jazz- 15%
Rock- 15%
other- 40%(mostly folk, but a little techno in there)
Jazz - 80%
Classical - 5%
Other - 15% (broad mix including some calypso, reggae, & steelband)
Out of approximately 4,000 LPs...
Classical - 85%
Rock - 5%
Acoustic Folk, Celtic, Blues and Jazz - 10%
Classical- 5%
Jazz- 20%
Rock- 60%
other- 15%

LP'S 60%
CD'S 38%
Tape 2%
50/50 classical and heavy metal.
Jazz 45%

Classical 35%

Rock 15%
95% Classical, rest of it is some Jazz and Blues.
12%Progressive, 7%Classic Rock, 8%Jazz Punk, 12%Avant-jazz, 15%Fusion, 14%ECM, 4%Soundtracks, 10%Electronics, 5%Underground 5%Noise, 5%French Chanson, The rest is classical and traditional jazz.
50% Blues & Rock
5% Classical
5% Jazz
20% C/W
10% New Age
10% Other--probably mainly "Pop"
Thank you Ramond for your support.

I mainly listen to Progressive rock , hard rock , folk rock, classic rock, early 70's metal, Psych, Blues like SRV and Hendrix, etc., etc.. To me this all fits into the ROCK category, just like there are various forms of Jazz and classical music as well.

I thought people could generalize and pigeon hole their music into one of these main categories.

If your main interest was blues I thought you would tell us. I did not include RAP and I think you know why.

Reading some of the music threads, I saw many audiophiles’s listing their favorite music. Rock Artists that I like, popped up alot. I was trying to find out if we Audio nuts here at audiogon were all classical music lovers, just like most of the record companies think.

Of my 1500 LP's
80% ROCK, 20% Jazz, NO classical, I listen to symphonic rock instead.

I like Classical and have been to the Opera and Symphony many times, but I don't have any in my record collection.
I also have those Andreas Vollenweider LP's. I love them and I listen to them quite a bit lately.


Got-cha Rockin',

You wanted to say that you mostly have a "non-audiophile-grade" kinda music!

I love classical(mostly large orchestral) not less than I love rock but wouldn't waste my time to bring it right from the speakers and electronics. Neither vinyl or CD can properly "contain" a close to reality "information" of recorded large string and brass orchestra. CD mostly suffers from lack of clarity and vinyl from lack of dynamics not even speaking of electronics and speakers capabilities... Even on so called "audiophile recordings" musicians must "behave" next to the microphone which drastically decreases let's say "spiritual factor" making Allegro sound as Lulliby or vice versa if measure to the extreams.

I get bored by most of traditional jazz bands (with exception to Dave Brubeck) but due to their outstanding recording qualities I have Mono original vinyls of some famous traditional jazz musicians.

SACD is audiophile-oriented format that firstly will spread on most-of audiophile listened music but later-on might eventually go for selected rock bands that are so-called folk singers: Led Zeppelin, Jethro Tull, Yes, Deep Purple etc... but will never I think go beyond King Crimson and more serious level than King Crimson.
Marakanetz are you trying to start a pissing contest.

No, I didn't say that I mostly have a "non-audiophile-grade" kinda music! that’s your opinion.

Most of my lp's are japanese/gdr/uk imports also some Dcc and classic records etc. reissues. I am very picky about the quality of my vinyl.

Classical music has only about a 2% market share of the new record/cd sales.

So far only 2 of the responders to this thread have over 50% classical music in their collections.

The main age group that is now buying high-end audio is aprox, 40 to 50 years old.

We grew up with the Stones and Beatles, not “Beethoven Symphonies”.

It is also accepted that the music we listen to between the ages of 16 to 22 is kind of our set point.
This is the music we own, go back to, and love.

So considering all these points, one would assume Classical would no longer be the dominant form of music that today’s audiophile listens to.

I am curious to see if this is true, not for people to criticize each other for their music of

If you check this Thread you will see this answers my question. Looks like Classical is the big looser.
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