Can u make interconnect from speaker cables


I haver a 26 foot pair of the CRL Silver speaker cables that I am not using- Can I cut them to length and reterminate them for use as Interconnects or are they completley different type of wires- thanks
fluffers
It would probably be a lot of work. Some IC makers do not use a shield but they often braid the hot and ground to help cope with no real shield. Another challenge would be adapting the much heavier gauge in a speaker cable to fit in your connectors. No reason that I have experienced to keep the larger gauge and the extra capacitance from the larger gauge can be a problem. However if you do not have IC's that are not silver wire based you may want to explore it a bit further.

It is very rare, but I've seen some companies using a coaxial cable, which is suitable for interconnects because of its inherent shielding capabilities, for a speaker cable design.

I have not seen anybody using larger gauge cables (usually used in speaker cables) for an interconnect design. It is generally not recommended to use speaker cable for interconnect and vice-versa.

You can contact CRL and ask them if that particular cable design can be used for an interconnect cable. I will be very surprised if CRL says yes to this question.

These are two interesting articles on audio cables:

Speaker Cable Article

Coaxial Cable Article
If it is wire you can do whatever wit them. The problem is... IMO if you have to ask, you are not qualified to make something like that out of them.
Otherwise sure.
You can sell the CRL Silver speaker cable and try many..many interconnects...
LOL!, Interconnects have a different science behind them!, or, the speaker cables would be no different than interconnects!, One cable is designed for a strong signal, the other is for a much weaker signal!, anything may work!,The question is, will it work for the application?,mmmm!, Good luck!
Audiolabyrinth
A cockamamy answers like yours. Makes junk science look good.

It is very rare, but I've seen some companies using a coaxial cable, which is suitable for interconnects because of its inherent shielding capabilities, for a speaker cable design.

I have not seen anybody using larger gauge cables (usually used in speaker cables) for an interconnect design. It is generally not recommended to use speaker cable for interconnect and vice-versa.

You can contact CRL and ask them if that particular cable design can be used for an interconnect cable. I will be very surprised if CRL says yes to this question.

These are two interesting articles on audio cables:

Speaker Cable Article

Coaxial Cable Article
Not sure that it would be physically practicable to attach RCA connectors to the ends of these (and most other) speaker cables.

Even if it were, the technical considerations and parameters for the two types of cables are very different, as Audiolabyrinth indicated. It would function, but I suspect that a $50 pair of pro-oriented Mogami interconnects, that are designed to be interconnects, would provide better sonics.

Unfortunately, the CRL website does not present much in the way of technical data for their cables, even on basic parameters such as inductance, capacitance, resistance, and wire gauge, so it is hard to be more specific. It is apparent, though, that their speaker cables are unshielded, while their interconnects are shielded. In many systems can have significant implications with respect to susceptibility to buzz and hum that can be caused by ground loop effects and RFI/EMI pickup, especially with unbalanced (RCA) interconnections.

Finally, you would be destroying the resale value of your $4K+ speaker cables.

Regards,
-- Al
You certainly can, in the same way that you can make a motorcycle out of your family sedan.

Actually, it was all the rage as few years back to make speaker cables out of Home Depot power cords and cat5 cables, so why not try it? The results will be somewhat unpredictable however. From a financial standpoint, it might just make a bit more sense to sell them on to someone that can enjoy them as speaker cables and buy a nice set of interconnects, YMMV. Best of luck.
Ask a guitar player...and the answer is no...too noisy.
No, no you can't do that. Previous posts are spot on and good advice.
@ schipo, If you do not like the answer thats your problem!, It makes no since, to cry over it on audiogon!
Can you make a silk purse out of a sows ear not really Dudes!!
but you can make a smaller sows ear from a larger sows ear. right? hahah
I have very successfully made speaker cables out of interconnect wire, to be precise Canare GS6. It is Sold by Canare primarily as guitar wire. It is made with a single stranded 18 awg OFC conductor in a teflon insulation and a braided copper shield. Works great for 3ft long speaker cables.

I am using the same wire for an interconnect, between my processor and pre-amp. This is not critical application in my system as pro is only used to decode the Dolby from TV into analog. But I must say other wires by Canare such as L-2T2S make a better interconnect.

So if you have a not so great interconnect wire you may be able to make speaker cables from it, but I doubt the opposite is possible.
Audiolabyrinth
No it's not my problem it's everyones problem. When silly information is panned out as an actual science.
@ Schipo,, Why do I want to write up a 3 page post of science of cables?, LOL!,I am to lazy to go thru all that!,, I never claimed to have a degree in electronics anyway!,, I tell you what, I am A good natured person, so to end this before I get frustrated with you,, I will apalogize for my answer, I am sorry, please excuse me. cheers!
I'd lay odds that many companies are already doing this. I already have, using early version of Morrow Audio wire. Others (including Mike Morrow) should correct me, but I swear that it's the same stuff, differing only in the number of strands. Certainly sounds fine enough in both roles.
Yes, Many factors to consider but lets not forget that some companies do use the same wire for I/C's and speaker wire. Kimber Kable comes to mind. Granted, He uses less strands in the I/C's but it is the same wire.