Can I use an isolation stand with an isolation pad?


I bought a 5.1 surround sound system recently, and got an IsoAccoustics isolation stand for my subwoofer. Unfortunately my neighbor below me can hear the bass if I'm watching a loud movie (in a condo, hardwood floors). I'm wondering if I should buy an isolation pad - like the Auralex Subdude HT - for under the stand, or if there might be a better approach? The music store I went to steered me away from isolation pads and towards the stand, but it's clearly not doing enough on its own. Thanks to anyone with advice!



dantengwen
The isoacoustics are fantastic.

There is nothing more you can do if the floor/ceiling between the two apartments is not concerte you are out of luck and you will have leakage

Dave and Troy
Audio Doctor NJ
Here is a possibly dumb solution:

How about suspending the subwoofer from the ceiling?

Before you laugh, when I was in college our dorm (barracks) had very bouncy wooden floors. Even my roommates B&O turntable with its own internal suspension would skip when someone stomped or jumped even in the room next door. So we used cotton webbing straps and suspended it from the ceiling. It worked great Of course we had to stabilize it with a horizontal strap since it tended to sway from the motor momentum.
That's why I found a condo on 1st floor which is 3 ft concerte roof of underground garage .
Here is a possibly dumb solution:

How about suspending the subwoofer from the ceiling?

Before you laugh, when I was in college our dorm (barracks) had very bouncy wooden floors. Even my roommates B&O turntable with its own internal suspension would skip when someone stomped or jumped even in the room next door. So we used cotton webbing straps and suspended it from the ceiling. It worked great Of course we had to stabilize it with a horizontal strap since it tended to sway from the motor momentum.
hahah thankyou so much
VidMate AnyDesk mobdro.onl/
In the end 20hz tone is 56.5 ft long so your neighbour will almost always hear the bass louder then you. even a 40hz tone is 28ft long so bass is always a hard thing to tame in smaller spaces. I've seen an issues were my friend had no bass in his apartments but his neighbour down the hall was booming really loud. Bass traps may help but probably not much for your neighbours. turn it down is really the only thing you can do other then what you have already done...not ideal to be that close to neighbours and love audio-movies I feel your pain I'm in a similar situation.
Springs, my friend. Especially for subwoofers as they produce very low frequencies, unlike your average full range speaker.
You can get all sorts of springs from McMaster-Carr. Really cheap too.
 Of, course it helps to know what you’re doing. No offense to you personally.
None taken. And good advice as well. No offense....to you personally. 
I would know which springs to buy. You, I’m not so sure. I could be wrong. 
The first thing you need to figure out is if the noise that is bothering your neighbor is from mechanical coupling of the subwoofer to the floor or just the sound waves passing through the floor.

The former can be addressed by isolating the subwoofer. The latter can only be addressed by reducing the volume of your lower frequency sounds (i.e. less or no subwoofer).

My guess is that it's like @glennewdick says and you'll have to turn it down, forego the lower frequencies, or find some other compromise with your neighbor.
@geoffkait : said " I would know which springs to buy."

I bet you do. I'm sure you can send him to just the right web site too. With very very special springs.

He also said:  "I could be wrong."

Geoff, we all know you don't believe that.
Are you channeling glubson? If so you’re doing an excellent job. Newbies have a propensity to sass their elders and want to take charge and move out. But move where? 😁 McMaster Carr - supplier to the stars ⭐️ 
@geoffkait : " Are you channeling glubson?"

I have no idea what you'er talking about. But I'm sure you do and that's all that counts.

"Newbies have a propensity to sass their elders..."

Are you an old man Geoff? It certainly doesn't come across that way...(read sarcasm)....

" McMaster Carr - supplier to the stars"

Same stuff, right? Well, without the magic and the voodoo.....and insane prices. And as I'm sure you can attest, its the high price which really produces the desired effect...............
Whoa! You are good at the back and forth. Very ouch! I might have underestimated you. 🙄
geoffkait,

"Are you channeling glubson?"
I am not that influential, but I will take a compliment.

"I might have underestimated you. 🙄"
You seem to underestimate just about everyone. Except yourself. That is where you overestimate.
The material that precision compression springs from McMaster-Carr are made of is.....Music-wire steel.

n80 may actually know which springs to choose after all.

(n80: 1, geoffkait: 0) (again)
While it’s admirable that newbies support each other, it very touching 😢, this isolation spring kerfuffle is probably just a case of even a blind dog finds a bone once in a while. Instant expert syndrome. 🤗
Getting back to the question posed by the OP for a moment the general answer is no, you should not (rpt not) use two isolation devices in series, only under special conditions. It would be like driving a car down the road with two shock absorbers connected in series to the wheels. The shock absorbers would interfere with each other and the ride would be extremely bumpy. Is is possible to construct a dual layer mass on spring isolation platform, I actually sell one, the Nirvana. But it’s tricky. The most straightforward solution for SQ would be to put cones under the stand. 
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