Buzzing just won't quit: Can someone please help?


Hello,
First let me thank you for taking the time to read my post. I’ve been trying to get this buzz out of my system that I just can’t lick. It’s really starting to drive me nuts. Here is a spectragraphic image of the sound https://imgur.com/a/xREqG. Here’s a WAV of the sound: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B_YygM_VDhV9RWlPMEVudjBnb28 

My system:
Bryston BP17 preamp
2x Schiit Vidar poweramps, running in monoblock
Sonus Faber Venere 3.0 speakers.
Velodyne DPS10 sub
Schiit Gungnir MB DAC
Music Hall MMF 2.3 TT
Marantz NR-1604 AVR, w/ Roku, CC, and Blu-ray
Samsung Plasma TV
No cable

Facts:
- All devices are on the same circuit.
- The buzzing comes through on LR channels (powered by Vidars) and powered subwoofer, BUT NOT through the surround sound speakers, which are powered by the AVR.
- Poweramps, preamp, AVR, and TV are all on the same plug (via ATC power conditioning strip)

What I’ve tried:
-I have physically disconnected EVERYTHING except the poweramps and the speakers. Everything was unplugged and disconnected EXCEPT the poweramps to the speakers (Wall > Vidar amp (no input) > Venere speaker). Subwoofer unplugged/disconnected. This made no difference.
- I’ve tried an Ebtech HumX hum eliminators on the amps. Did nothing (though it did wonders for my plasma TV).
- I’ve tried switching around to different wall outlets (though all are on the same circuit).

What I’ve determined so far:
- The problem ISN’T the Schiit poweramps. I know this because I hear the buzz coming through the sub, which has its own power.
- The problem isn’t due to the 10000 devices I have because it occurs even when the entire system is disconnected except amps and speakers (with no input in the amp).

So what can I do? Is there some kind of fancy "power conditioner" thing I can buy? One of those Blue Circle Thingees? If I buy a power conditioner, does it have to have regeneration? Would something like a Panamax M5300-PM or something like that be adequate?

Please help me!
naseltzer
I installed the Nordost QKore6 grounding system along with a Nordost QBase8 into my system and the noise went away.  It sounds like a ground issue, but I'm not an electrician.

Did this noise just appear or have you been dealing with it since day 1?
What else is on this circuit? Do you by any chance have fluorescent lighting or LED lighting with one or more transformers on the same circuit?  Computer power supplies?  Have you checked to see if the circuit is wired correctly from outlets back down to the breaker panel?  If you have multiple outlets, how are they connected together on the circuit? Any use of j-boxes (metal), metal conduit, etc...

Have you connected the Vidar amps straight into the wall and skipped the ATC power strip? The Vidar is a stereo amp from what I can see online; did you try connecting only 1 to the speakers in its stereo native state instead of bridging to mono?

This is behaving like a ground connection unhooked, an improperly built interconnect (i.e. faulty ground), noisy transformer on the line or similar problem.  Need to narrow it down further...

This situation (and that WAV file) shows a somewhat challenging situation.  There are many things to check and rule out before you contemplate a power conditioner.
Do you use proper shielded interconnects, not those silly twisted pair cables with no shield? Have you confirmed that the shield is actually connected - the reason I say this, is I recently had an issue and found one of my interconnects between preamp and power amp had no shield connected on one end.

How loud is the noise?
Do you have a different amp you could drop in the system and narrow the problem to the Schiit amps? Also, I know you said you disconnected EVERYTHING, but I just want to be thorough: the amps make the noise even without ANY input cables physically connected to the amps (other than AC), correct?
Have you tried lifting the ground on the amps (using a cheater plug), only as a diagnostic measure?
Hi all,
Thank you so much for the responses. 
Zephr, I've tried unplugging everything else on the circuit. The buzzing still occurs with both the amp/speakers and the powered sub (independently). I've tried plugging the amps and the sub directly into the wall. No line inputs. 

James, noise never has and still doesn't come out of my AVR, which is what I used before I got the amps. I never noticed the buzz coming out of the sub until recently, however, because it's quieter and not noticeable from my listening position. Speakers buzzing since I got the amps. However, I had an Emotiva A-300 amp for a while and I don't recall it buzzing. It didn't have a ground and wasn't as powerful. It might have buzzed but just more softly. I can't be sure.

Raindance, my interconnects are Blue Jeans XLR between pre and amps, Blue Jeans RCA between DAC and pre. Cheap RCAs to sub. However, this noise still occurs with amps and subs simply powered on with no inputs.The noise loudness seems to fluctuate, generally a bit louder when I first power things on. Could be up to 46db, but will chill out down to maybe 36db.

Todd, I don't presently have a different amp, except for the ones built into my AVR and my powered sub. I suppose I also have one in my headphone amp. There is no noise in speakers powered by the AVR or headphones powered by the headphone amp, but the noise is present in the sub. Oh, I did previously have a cheaper Emotiva amp and I don't think it made the noise. That being said, it wasn't as powerful and I don't think it had a ground. I just tried lifting the ground on one of the amps with a cheater plug. No change. And yes, that's correct: makes noise with ONLY amps plugged into wall, speaker cables to speakers with no inputs, with no sub. Same for sub with no speakers.

Uhm, unplug everything, then connect your speakers to the AVR to see if the AVR has the same problem. 

I'm wondering if it could be a switching power supply somewhere on this same circuit (or something like florescent/led lighting on the same circuit).  It is possible that it could be house wiring.  You could switch off the master circuit breaker on the panel and go from outlet to outlet to make sure there is a good tight clamp-down on the bare wires.

Can you try using RCAs from pre to amps? Or are they balanced only? Though that shouldn't matter, since you said it happens with the amps having no cables going into them.. 


Since you hear this through your sub too, I would try this:  Take either the sub or your power amps and speakers to the other end of the house.  Or, you can run a really long extension cord.
This will tell you if it's the whole house or just that breaker.  If it's your house you would take a different route than if it's just one circuit.
The Nordost is way better than the thingee (way more expensive too) but neither can clean up a totally bad electrical feed.
No more advice from me until I know more about the rest of the home.

Okay, I took the sub to the other end of the house. I still heard a buzz, but I *think* it may have sounded a bit more faint. I've also tried connecting only one amp to one speaker, directly to the wall with everything else unplugged. No change. I also tried a cheater plug on an amp. Didn't help!
To diagnose the problem, unplug and disconnect everything and re-connect one thing at a time.
1. connect only one Schiit Vidar to a speaker, and plug in the power cord and turn it on, if no noise then go to the next step.
2. connect the other Schiit Vidar to a speaker, plug in the power cord and turn on both Vidar, if no noise then go to the next step.
3. Power off both Vidar, connect the Bryston BP17 preamp to one of the Schiit Vidar via XLR cable, power up the preamp and both Vidar, if no noise then go to the next step.
4. connect the other Schiit Vidar to the preamp and power up the preamp and both Vidar again, if no noise then go to the next step.
5. plug in the subwoofer, power up the subwoofer, preamp and both Vidar, if no noise then go to the next step.
6. connect the left channel line in of the subwoofer to the preamp line out, power up the subwoofer, preamp and both Vidar again, if no noise then go to the next step.
7. connect the right channel line in of the subwoofer to the preamp line out, power up the subwoofer, preamp and both Vidar again, if no noise then go to the next step.
8. plug in the DAC, power up the system, if no noise then go to the next step.
9. connect the DAC to the preamp line in, power up the system, if no noise then go to the next step.
10. play some music if no buzzing noise then you can connect the AVR, TV....
Hope you can find the culprit, good luck!  
One more thing is a ground lift they sell ground lift adapters for xlr,  and rca 
for there  is a differential problem where one component may be wired a certain way  another grounding scheme may not be so good  if you have a ground lift 
try on each interconnect cable until it eliminates it guitar center sells things like that or can order them..i spent a week one time going through this ,also your electrician if good can set up a true ground outside 4 ft Copper pipe 
and for sure Dedicated lines only , 12awg Or 10 awg Copper only no Aluminum,and high quality Copper gold outlets  not the junk they wire houses with are garbage .a Pangea Copper around $50 , or other brand,
a clear step up .yes it absolutely will add to your fidelity .
you may spend $ 500 to get dedicated lines, and the best grounding ,and outlets 
these are a must to get the most out of your system.any times other things in the house feed off and transmit noise frig,washer,dryer . Dedicated line, to dedicated 
ground .also A home surge suppressor to circuit breaker 50-80,000 Leviton for around $200 helps safe guard your home .10x better then any power strip.
If you’re in the U.S., it’s against code to install a second separate grounding rod. Also, having a second grounding rod can cause a voltage differential to develop between the two grounds, actually causing a current to flow on the ground wire.. all connections need to be clean, tight and tied into the same ground as the rest of the system.  

I agree on the panel based surge suppressor being a good idea. But they are designed to work with a service entrance suppressor and an outlet suppressor you use at the appliance. Surge suppression is supposed to happen in stages, with each stage taking more of the current out of the surge.

Sorry, not trying to be argumentative. I just did a lot of research into this when I was deciding on what to do. I'm certainly no expert, but those were at least two things I learned in all my reading! 
toddverrone
If you’re in the U.S., it’s against code to install a second separate grounding rod. Also, having a second grounding rod can cause a voltage differential to develop between the two grounds, actually causing a current to flow on the ground wire.. all connections need to be clean, tight and tied into the same ground as the rest of the system.
+1 about the grounding, and +1 about all connections being clean and tight. That applies to every connection in the service panel, including the breakers themselves, and the connections between your meter pan and the panel.
(Wall > Vidar amp (no input) > Venere speaker). Subwoofer unplugged/disconnected. This made no difference. 

Well then it has to be the amps - if I read your above statement correct. that is is also present in your subwoofer is a separate issue.  

Best off luck 

Peter
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Dirty power can stink.  PS Audio regenerator?

BTW:  I have a whole house surge due to several hits on the poles and the transformer for the block is in front of my house.  Last time the main surge blew, so did my ps audio quintet.  The whole house is pretty hefty and kept the bulk of the lighting out but not enough to save the ps audio.  It was well worth frying the ps audio to save my system.
Will we ever hear back from the OP?