Bring on the criticism...


So I was swapping out my Maxx 1's for 2's a few weeks ago and yesterday it occurred to me since I can't bi-amp like I have always wanted I would bi-speaker. Two Maxx's side by each running off my FPB450's. I guess I never really considered myself an audiophile and this must confirm it, but I really like the stage it's throwing.
screename
Now you can tell Van Halen they don't have to bring their PA when they come by.
That's funny, but really what's wrong with this setup? I'm serious?
If you enjoy it, there's nothing wrong with it at all. I'm all for anyone having anything they want as long as I don't have to pay for it.
I've done this with speakers that didn't even match.
Monitors on top of large monitors.
I liked it.
That's funny, but really what's wrong with this setup? I'm serious?
Depends on what's important to you when you listen. Assuming the amp set-up can handle it, extra speakers can give you more volume and bass.

The drawbacks include a loss of precision in imaging and likely interference nodes between drivers, just to give you two thoughts.

Not everyone listens for the same things in audio. If you like it, go for it.
Thanks fellas, I appreciate the input. I haven't done any critical listening, just rock and house music. Guess that's why it seems to sound good to me.

I would love to get a switch going where I could compare the two speakers better. I know it exists...any help?
If you can afford to do that, why can't you biamp?
Agree with Mlsstl. It will work for a sound reinforcement system, but you could pay a lot less for a PA system that could do that. For the musical subtleties, imaging, soundstaging, timbre of instruments, I think what you're suggesting could be a problem. Of course, you could consider a four channel system (Peter McGrath's preferred way of listening), but that will require some more electronics.
I think if he likes it then it's okay;my only question is with the volumn set in one position does the sound level from speaker set A equal the sound level of speaker set B?
There must be an imaging issue. There is no way that two speakers will sound any good unless you already had a serious imaging problem. Admittedly the baffles, with all those edges and diffraction points, on the Maxx are bit baffling.
I agree with the several previous descriptions of the adverse effects you are likely to encounter. More specifically, a major effect is likely to be some degree of Comb Filtering. That occurs due to radiation of the same frequencies from different drivers in different locations, with those drivers having differing path lengths to your ears, resulting in differing arrival times.

I believe that the subjective result of that is a general "cloudiness" and loss of clarity. Of course, it is likely to be most perceivable on high quality material.

Regards,
-- Al
I did this when I blew the tweeters in my JBL L88's in the '70's. Removed the tweeters and sent them to JBL for repair/replacement (which they did with no charge, even though I was not the original owner of the speakers. Wow!) Anyway, I had a month or two with no tweeters. So since my Pioneer receiver had two sets of speaker outs, I connected a pair of no-name speakers from my first department store brand stereo, and placed them on top of the big JBL's. Problem solved.
If you can afford to do that, why can't you biamp?
Can't bi-amp Maxx's

you could pay a lot less for a PA system that could do that
But it wouldn't be a Wilson PA....lol
my only question is with the volumn set in one position does the sound level from speaker set A equal the sound level of speaker set B?
Both speakers are coming straight off the FPB450's so they are being fed the same power.
Correct they are being fed the same power but are they playing at equal sound pressure levels or is one pair louder than the other;that's what I was questioning.
It doesn't matter if the sensivity of the two are different. The effect is the same a wall of sound. I did this to get as much sound as I could. Then I started to like soundstage and imaging. Now I use 1 pair at a time and my tube amps wouldn't exactly like the drop in resistance.
Although I still have some SS amps and Klipsch LaScalas which I have once or twice connected in parallel to vintage JBL C36 and C38s (Yes both using D-130s, 131s with 075 tweeters)They are exquisitely sensative and seem to compete well with the Klipsch. I do it just for sheer volume try playing BBBAD Bad To The Bone like that when you feel raucous.I am rally getting too old for that I must admit.
Hmmm. interesting.

The tonal balance probably becomes a bit warmer, as each side's output will combine in-phase at low frequencies, while as Shadorne noted you will get comb-filtering (partial cancellation) at higher frequencies.

Comb filtering often looks a lot worse than it sounds; apparently the ear-brain mechanism is relatively tolerant of it.

Not knowing the exact geometry of the setup I can only speculate, but it's possible that the output from the outer speakers is arriving late enough that directional cues from its output are suppressed by the precedence effect. If so, imaging could be holding up quite well. Timbre may be richer and more vivid as well.

Duke
dealer/manufacturer
I did this with a JBL Paragon and JBL L80T's on top!! I was reproducing rock concert volume and the sound was way better then either speakers by themselves.
http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/hs081.ash2/37395_1391904432108_1067063525_31014705_7062778_n.jpg