Best affordable digital coax cable for connecting transport to re-clocker?


My Empirical Synchro-mesh is due to arrive today. I bought the Empirical cable to connect the re-clocker to my Aqua La Voce DAC but am wondering about what to use to connect the transport to the S. Mesh. I'd like to spend less than $400. Blue Jeans 1694A has been recommended. How might this compare with, say, Audioquest Carbon ? 
stuartk
You don’t need an expensive cable for the transport to Synchromesh. The critical area is from the reclocker to the DAC and Steve’s cable will minimize reflections and jitter.
The data stream from the transport will be clocked by the Synchromesh, so BJ cable should be fine.
ZU and DHL are best I've heard .

If you have a left-over cable from a transport or HT, even a Toslink, use this.  Totally non-critical.  Save your money.

Steve N.

Empirical Audio

You don’t need a special cable to the Synchromesh as it has a totally robust jitter rejection design. Same as the Benchmark series of DACs that reject all incoming jitter - no need for a special cable.

Special cables are only needed for devices that do NOT robustly reject incoming jitter. My advice is to avoid devices that do not thoroughly reject incoming jitter but everyone has their favorite DAC, even if most are jitterbugs.
OK. Message received loud and clear! Thanks.
Not meaning to be rhetorical, but I’m of the opinion that no DAC *rejects* jitter. Instead it boils down to how well the DAC deals with it once accepted. Oh and I too use Blue Jeans (Belden) 1694A.
If you can use a soldering iron, you may want to try the VH Audio Pulsar Ag
SPDIF Digital (75 ohm) cable with silver Eichmann connectors. Although the rca's are sold in sets of 4, Chris will sell you a pair. Cost would be around $200. 
@gdhal

The asynchronous clock is an example of jitter rejection. In the case of Benchmark, the incoming clock is digitally separate from the outgoing clock. Adjustments are made digitally at precisely 4 pSec intervals at an adjustment rate of less than 1Hz in order to match timing. If you can’t hear below 1 Hz then there is no audible jitter from the incoming clock reaching the DAC chip. It is quite simple to do this digitally - it is much harder to do things analog as 4 pSec accuracy is extreme.
If you can use a soldering iron, you may want to try the VH Audio Pulsar Ag
SPDIF Digital (75 ohm) cable with silver Eichmann connectors. Although the rca's are sold in sets of 4, Chris will sell you a pair. Cost would be around $200.

Way overkill.  I would not spend more than $50.

The asynchronous clock is an example of jitter rejection. In the case of Benchmark, the incoming clock is digitally separate from the outgoing clock. Adjustments are made digitally at precisely 4 pSec intervals at an adjustment rate of less than 1Hz in order to match timing. If you can’t hear below 1 Hz then there is no audible jitter from the incoming clock reaching the DAC chip. It is quite simple to do this digitally - it is much harder to do things analog as 4 pSec accuracy is extreme.

This is a good way to reclock because it does not change the data, but it has performance limitations. I had a product previous to the Synchro-Mesh that did something similar, adjusting every few seconds slightly higher and lower in frequency to "bracket" the incoming frequency in order to clock the output of a FIFO. Been there, done that. There are many of these still in use.

The problem is not the technique, it is the quality of the local master clock and associated circuitry and the quality of the power supply powering it and the decoupling caps etc.. If the clock is controllable in any way and not just free-running, it will never have the low jitter that is possible with a free-running clock IME. My own solution like this had this problem, so ultimately I went to the resampler instead.

Steve N.

Empirical Audio

Here is a perfect cable for $20, free shipping:


" Way overkill. I would not spend more than $50"
Although I disagree, you certainly have the right to your opinion.