Bass Attenuation - best approach


I've been using the Martin Logan Odyssey speakers since new about 14 yrs ago and have been very happy with them in almost all respects. 2 days ago, however, I auditioned a pair of Martin Logan Theos speakers and heard what I thought to be, better detail in the upper mid ranges. I know that improvements in ML's overall technology has been made but I'm wondering if some of this "improvement" , at least to my ear, has something to do with the more limited bass output of the Theos. It's not that the Odysseys are lacking in the upper registers, but I feel that the bass output interferes or detracts from my appreciation of them. It's not that it's muddy or boomy; it's just there. I do have personal hearing issues (I'm 72 yrs old) that may contribute to this phenomenon but I'm looking for the best way to make an adjustment to accommodate my listening tastes.

My understanding of the most obvious fixes include using a good equalizer or going back to bi-wiring and installing resistance in the bass path. What I'm hoping for, then, is some advice regarding the best approach to this issue and will appreciate any that's offered.

My equipment is: Shanling CD100 disk player, Peachtree Audio Nova used as a preamp and Peachtree audio 220W power amp.
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I owned Odysseys for quite awhile and loved them when I had an all Martin Logan HT system. Have you tried moving them farther out away from the walls?
Get a Rives PARC there are 2 for sale on the bay. One is mine. Selling due to getting my room completely done for stereo only. Nothing else but a chair in the room.
I have a PARC and it worked wonders, but only after treating the room with Tube Traps. Have you tried that first?
"My understanding of the most obvious fixes include using a good equalizer or going back to bi-wiring and installing resistance in the bass path. What I'm hoping for, then, is some advice regarding the best approach to this issue and will appreciate any that's offered."

I don't know why you would assume the speakers are at fault. You heard the Theos in a different room with different electronics. To start with, I would bring your current electronics in to store that you heard the Theos and see how they sound with your gear.
Thanks for your responses. When I bought these I too was into HT and had all ML equipment with the Odysseys in the system as R and L fronts. When I switched back to 2 channel years ago I tried Electra and Nautilus for short periods but eventually returned to the Odysseys which, thank goodness, I had kept in storage. Having used ESL's for over 10 years before these, I guess I'm habituated to their sound.

I have not tried traps or any other type of room treatment primarily because my listening room, although fairly large, is our living room. I do have them located three and a half feet from the rear wall and about three feet from the side walls. I know from reading other comments that for best results they need even more room than that but most of us don't have that option.

I have completely enjoyed these for many years in the same environment as they now reside but hearing issues have progressed to the point that I don't do well even on a day to day basis when there are competing sounds. The quality of my equipment or listening environment, then, are important but my problem here is related more, I'm sure, to my own personal hearing issues.

Except for the expense involved I'm not adverse to the idea of trying the newer ML Theos or Ethos speakers but I'm still very satisfied with sound reproduction from the transducers; it's the woofer section (frequencies below about 350Hz) that I feel need taming.

I'll look into the PARC suggestion but continue pursuing the idea of adding resistance to the bass section and would appreciate any advice on that matter.