Any high-end dealers care to respond?

In ten years I have purchased goods from many high-end stores in three different states, and I would say that my good experiences equal the number of bad experiences. I never know from one visit to the next at my favorite stores if I'll leave excited about a purchase or cursing about a rude salesperson. Why are high end salespeople so fickle? Is it a reflection upon the owners or the industry? Is it the customers? Should I contact the owners and relate my experience?
Maybe talk to the owner(s) or even the sales people (privately) if it bothers you a lot. I worked retail gourmet food and wine for seven years and had my good and bad days. I still regret putting the customer with a speech impediment out of my store (even though the only word that I could make out was "MF'er"), I probably could have handled it better.
Here's some input from a sales-type, albeit computer software and not audio hardware. To start, remember that a salesman is going to be focused on closing the sale, not necessarily on "your listening enjoyment." His job is to move hardware and he's likely incented via commissions to do so. It's how he makes his living, so give him a little leeway. We all have to eat.

If he's a GOOD salesman he will remember that your needs and desires are key components in the overall equation. In real life not everyone is good. Many salesmen are too focused on their commissions and forget to consider what the customer wants. That's a management or policy issue and the owner should be interested in the feedback.

I've also read that some in the industry feel being snooty is a qualifier as it runs off all but the most serious buyers. For the lazy types interested in getting the highest commissions for the minimal amount of effort it may be a useful tool. Only the most "damn the torpedoes" buyer would put up with some of these guys, so the salesman does end up doing less work. In reality it's also a good way to lose business as it also turns off the uninitiated and discourages less assertive individuals. They either buy somewhere else of not at all. That is bad for us all. Regardless of what he's selling, a salesman should spend at least a little time educating the market and playing emissary. If all of them did the market would increase and we would all gain from it, manufacturers, retailers and enthusiasts, too.

Also, don't walk into any retail shop and expect to find the highest levels of professionalism, smoothest sales techniques, etc. The guys that have mastered those are doing it where they make the most money. That probably isn't in audio (much speculation on my part). I do deserve, expect and even sometimes demand, courtesy and respect. I AM the customer, dammit! Solutions? Consider speaking with the owner or hiring manager, but don't be surprise if you may get more of the same. People tend to hire others like themselves. You can also be assertive with the salesman. Politely put take him to task. Point out that he is losing you a a potential customer by his actions. The key here is POLITELY. If done right he will respond in a positive way. The idea is to command his respect, not embarrass him or make a scene. The only other option is vote with your feet. If you do, be sure someone knows. It adds emphasis.
Fpeel, very good post. I regret our negative exchanges least for now, muh hah hah! One thing: "vote with your feet"? Forgive my ignorance, is that like stomping out of the place, or merely "walking to" the place that deserves your business?
"Voting with one's feet" means going somewhere else to buy.
I thought so, just wanted to clarify. I want to apologize again, for our previous exchanges. Just wanted to get it off my chest. But perhaps if you think it's false contrition, then so be it.
If we've disagreed in the past, Carl, then we've had an exchange of ideas. Nothing wrong with that, is there? Now, if you intentionally insulted me at some point and that's what the apology is for, you'll have to try harder because I missed it. Personally, I hope you didn't, won't and our exchanges will continue to be held in a fashion conducive to all of us learning from each other.

Happy New Year, Carl. May it be your best ever!