A sub with L & R RCA inputs???


Folks...on the hunt for a new sub that has a Left and Right input from an integrated amp. I have a Coda CSI Integrated amp that actually has a separate pre-amp outputs for a subwoofer. Curious to know if anyone knows aof a few subs that might have this sort of configuration for input...I know that the LFE is only a single, wonder if a splitter might be my ticket.

Thoughts??? or suggestions???

Room is large 600 sqft hardwood floors with large floor rugs and furniture and 7 ft ceilings. Main seating is 25ft x 15ft.
shakedown
There are a large list of subs that have L R RCA inputs.
Rel is not one of them.
Went to the Rel site and opened a manual at random and it has left and right line level inputs. I think most powered subs have L&R inputs
Alan
LFE stands for 'Low Frequency Effects' (maybe you didn't know that, a lot of people don't) but the key word is EFFECTS. The single LFE signal has been 'processed' (as set by YOU) at the receiver/processor. IOW, with the LFE signal, the L and R channels have already been combined, the low pass frequency has been established, and often other parameters have/can be set (again, by you, from the menu on your A/V processor) depending on the features available on your processor. When you are playing 5.1 or 7.1 surround, the 'point one' subwoofer signal is "good to go" -- meaning that none of the controls on the sub itself are operable (except level) when using the LFE input. If you "process" everything you listen to (including two channel material) into surround sound, then you should only be using the LFE input regardless of the brand/model of sub.

The L and R single ended inputs are completely separate (and different) animals from the LFE input. First of all, ALL the controls on the back of the sub are operable when using the L+R inputs: phase, frequency crossover point and slopes, volume, high pass points (if you are sending the signal on to your main speakers) certain room-correction circuitry if your sub has room correction features (such as a microphone to set them up.) The subwoofer's amplifier only 'samples' the low frequency content of the L+R signals anyway (meaning, the actual L+R signals coming from your preamp/processor dont really 'drive' the subwoofer amp directly, whereas the LFE signal DOES actually drive the subwoofer amp.) So by keeping the L+R signals (coming from your preamp/processor) separate, you don't run the risk of compromising the output circuits of the preamp/processor by using a 'Y' connector. You can not (and should not) have signal going into BOTH the L+R inputs and the LFE input at the same time UNLESS there is a way at the sub or at the processor to turn one of them off as applicable.

All that said, the Woodmere II's already go down to 25Hz (at least according to the manufacturer ;~) so in your modest size room, with all those drivers going already, I can't imagine what you think you'll gain by adding a subwoofer?
I used to own a Von Schweikert sub that had left and right RCA inputs.
The VRS1 was what it was called, Great sub but alas I when back to 2 Channel and a pair of Large full range floorstanding speakers that made the sub redundant.
These are great responses..Many thanks Nsgarch..I have since moved and have not updated my pictures and have a totally different arrangement. The Woodmere's are now in a room with more breathing room and have fully opened up. But since the Coda Csi hd this capability I thought it wouldn't hurt to put this out for some opinions. The bass is even deeper in the new enviroment and I couldn't be happier (I think)...Since the Coda has been a blessing to the Woodmere's I wonder what the Sub would add if anything.
Shakedown, the "subwoofer" main outputs on the back of your Coda are exact duplicates of the "preamp" main outputs. Just different labels. In theory, the Woodmeres should give you all the low frequency bass you need. In pactice though, as things are now, it won't be well controlled low bass (good damping), unless you get the amp(s) next to the speaker(s). If you keep the Coda near your listening chair, you'll be running rather long speaker cables, which ruin good bass transient response. If you put the Coda between the speakers, that's a little bit better solution for good bass control, but incovenient from a user standpoint.

All this is a good argument for separate components over integrateds, which IMO are best reserved for bedroom systems. In your situation, you'd get a lot better performance out of your main speakers by using a pair of monoblock amps next to the speakers, and preamp and sources next to your listening position. A preamp preferably with balanced outputs to drive longer cables to the monoblock amps (although with well designed/shielded single-ended cables, you can go up to 40 ft with no problem.) As things are now, adding a subwoofer won't do anything to improve the (somewhat less than optimum) performance of your Tylers. So I'd work toward improving the relationship between your main speakers and the amp(s) that drive them.
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Nsg....hmmm...Well I am quite impressed with the Coda and its driving capabilities...I have completely removed my Modwright 9.0 from my system and I would love to bring it back from time to time for the love of tubes...Any suggestions on some good monoblocks then that might mate well with my Modwright...I did send it back to Dan for the upgraded rectified power supply when I recently had it overhauled before I stored it...wish to bring it back soon...Right now the distance between my speakers is 16 ft.
" Right now the distance between my speakers is 16 ft."

That's quite far apart . . . do you mean the distance from your speakers to your listening position?
If you like tubes, then the best place to reap their benefit(s) is in a device that actually amplifies the signal. That would be amplifiers (obviously;~), phonoamps, and microphone amps. Preamplifiers are basically source selectors and volume/balance controllers. They don't really do any 'amplifying'. What we want in a preamp is QUIET! Before a signal gets to the main amplifier, having tubes in the signal path only adds "tube hiss" and who needs that? We do put up with a little tube hiss from phonoamps b/c you get great phono amplification (bang for the buck) with tubes. Not to say there aren't some really great ss phonoamps, but they all start a ten times the price of a similarly great sounding tube phonoamp -- of course you don't play vinyl, so none of that concerns you -- but I'm just saying ;~)

If you want a great sounding system starting from where you are now, you should think about a nice pair of tube monblocks for your Tylers. I think the Woodmeres are fairly efficient (the website no longer lists the specs for them) so you wouldn't need a super powerful amp; but more important, if you want to use tubes to enjoy the quality of all the Woodmeres' Scan-Speak drivers, both bass and mids, then you want to preserve all the damping ability that a tube amp can muster -- which means keeping speaker cables as short as possible. Thus the recommendation for monoblocks. If you want to use a ss amp, it could practically be in the garage as long as the speaker cables' conductors are big enough (10AWG). But tube amplification would be delicious with those speakers. And some day, if you want to bi-amp them, and get a couple of modest ss amps just for the woofers, you'd be way ahead (sonically) for the money, than you would be just throwing a sub into the current mix (even though Tyler makes some nice subs ;~)
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Hi Shake ;~)
First of all, did you mean your speakers are 16 feet away from your listening position (not 16 feet apart, which is pretty wide apart?)

If you like tubes, then the best place to reap their benefit(s) is in a device that actually amplifies the signal. That would be amplifiers (obviously;~), phonoamps, and microphone amps. Preamplifiers are basically source selectors and volume/balance controllers. They don't really do any 'amplifying'. What we want in a preamp is QUIET! Before a signal gets to the main amplifier, having tubes in the signal path only adds "tube hiss" and who needs that? We do put up with a little tube hiss from phonoamps b/c you get great phono amplification (bang for the buck) with tubes. Not to say there aren't some really great ss phonoamps, but they all start at ten times the price of a similarly great sounding tube phonoamp -- of course you don't play vinyl, so none of that concerns you -- but I'm just saying ;~)

If you want a great sounding system starting from where you are now, you should think about a nice pair of tube monblocks for your Tylers. I think the Woodmeres are fairly efficient (the website no longer lists the specs for them) so you wouldn't need a super powerful amp; but more important, if you want to use tubes to enjoy the quality of all the Woodmeres' Scan-Speak drivers, both bass and mids, then you want to preserve all the damping ability that a tube amp can muster -- which means keeping speaker cables as short as possible. Thus the recommendation for monoblocks. If you use a ss amp like your Coda, especially with efficient speakers, it could practically be in the garage as long as the speaker cables' conductors are big enough (10AWG). But tube amplification would really be delicious with those speakers. And some day, if you want to bi-amp them, and get a couple of modest ss amps just for the woofers, you'd be way ahead (sonically) for the money, than you would be just throwing a sub into the current mix (even though Tyler makes some nice subs ;~)
If you like tubes, then the best place to reap their benefit(s) is in a device that actually amplifies the signal. That would be amplifiers (obviously;~), phonoamps, and microphone amps. Preamplifiers are basically source selectors and volume/balance controllers. They don't really do any 'amplifying'. What we want in a preamp is QUIET! Before a signal gets to the main amplifier, having tubes in the signal path only adds "tube hiss" and who needs that? We do put up with a little tube hiss from phonoamps b/c you get great phono amplification (bang for the buck) with tubes. Not to say there aren't some really great ss phonoamps, but they all start a ten times the price of a similarly great sounding tube phonoamp -- of course you don't play vinyl, so none of that concerns you -- but I'm just saying ;~)

If you want a great sounding system starting from where you are now, you should think about a nice pair of tube monblocks for your Tylers. I think the Woodmeres are fairly efficient (the website no longer lists the specs for them) so you wouldn't need a super powerful amp; but more important, if you want to use tubes to enjoy the quality of all the Woodmeres' Scan-Speak drivers, both bass and mids, then you want to preserve all the damping ability that a tube amp can muster -- which means keeping speaker cables as short as possible. Thus the recommendation for monoblocks. If you want to use a ss amp, it could practically be in the garage as long as the speaker cables' conductors are big enough (10AWG). But tube amplification would be delicious with those speakers. And some day, if you want to bi-amp them, and get a couple of modest ss amps just for the woofers, you'd be way ahead (sonically) for the money, than you would be just throwing a sub into the current mix (even though Tyler makes some nice subs ;~)
Sorry about the double-posting. It's not me, honest! ;~))
Nsgarch...Many thanks again...no worries on the double vision post...I have a fairly modest SS amp that is also stored my B&K Reference 200.7 that I used in conjunction with the Modwright preamp. This was a very nice combo for me..Reason for my change was in my old address I had an electrical issue that was very noticeable in noise through the lines. I have not broken out the Tube and SS combo yet to see if my new location is any better...I have an electrician on deck to get me a dedicated circuit run if need be that will be nice and clean to my room (probably going to do that anyhow for peace of mind)...The Woodmere II's that I own are 4ohm rated and have triple posts and according to Ty these have the crossovers for Tri-amping if desired..
I meant tri-wired not amped