70’s rock pressings. Witch equipment deserve?


I have 3.000 LP, most of it 70’s prog rock. Some of them are “audiophile” pressings (Classic Records... etc). But just a few.

Is it worth it a expensive capsule/phonopreamp for that kind of recordings? 

I know that classical music, or jazz masterings were masterworks in their times, and deserves the best capsule/preamp you can buy.

But I dont’t know if Genesis, PF, King Crimson, Magma... 70’s pressings would get much better with a super capsule or it’s better to invest in other parts of the chain to achieve the best sound.

Thanks! Be safe!
ramon74
Suspension on brand new LOMC cartridges collapse faster than stylus, those cartridges cost $3000-5000.

None of my MM/MI cartridges have such problem even if they are 30-40 y.o. Most of the vintage MM or MI are high compliance (30-50cu), even if you can imagine that the rubber is a bit stiffer it is not a problem at all, they are still fantastic in terms of sound quality. Simple test on Hi-Fi Test LP and anyone can check suspension condition, those cartridges easily pass all 4 tracks, the last track is an extreme high modulation groove, bad cartridges simply jump out of the groove, but all my vintage MM/MI do not skip on this track. Checked this Grace LEVEL II Ruby yesterday on Hi-Fi News Test LP, great tracker! No problem at all. Same with every vintage MM or MI in my collection.

Sometimes I just don’t understand why people have so much problems, i never had anything like that with vintage cartridges, except for Technics MM cartridges! This is where the rubber formula is so bad. But even in this situation the rubber is softened, not stiff.

I have never seen a Grace, Stanton, Pickering, Audio-Technica, Pioneer, Garrott ... with softened or stiff rubber damper in my life.

Apart from Technics that almost always have serious problem with damper I recall only one model of Victor with the same problem (the X1), but in the next X1II series this problem was solved by the manufacturer (tried many samples and all are fine). Always hunting for NOS styli for vintage MM and bought many of them.

I have never seen a Grace, Stanton, Pickering, Audio-Technica, Pioneer, Garrott ... with softened or stiff rubber damper in my life.
I have seen this multiple times with Shure, Pickering, Stanton, AudioTechnica, Empire, Grado but some of the others you've mentioned I've no experience. However the operating principle is the same so unless the manufacturer developed a very special suspension material my guess is that you have been very lucky or (more likely IMO) the cartridges might seem to be performing well but would sound smoother and more detailed with a stylus replacement.
Going back to the vinyl pressings, I am in the process of getting some records, mostly rock records and also some jazz, swing, blues etc.
Options are to get older pressings from Discog listed as Mint by sellers with positive reviews, budget is limited, however I see modern pressings, remasters at half speed 45 rpm of certain music I'm interested in.
1. Would it be best to get the newer pressings at double the cost of older used records? I get older records might have surface noise etc. but possibly the recording quality could be best as well?2. Labels like Mobile fidelity, Chasing the Dragon, Analogue Productions should I assume everything they do assuming using the original tape masters is better than in the old days? or should I still go with older pressings? Newer content obviously better to be purchased new
Thank you all

 I go for the original if I can find it- original press from the country where the recording was made. But if the title isn't that important to me I often pick up a reissue.
the cartridges might seem to be performing well but would sound smoother and more detailed with a stylus replacement.

Replacing a NOS stylus make no sense, vintage cartridges can be found with NOS or unused styli, sometimes a NOS can be purchased separately. 

If someone has been using a cartridge with advanced stylus profile even for 300 hours it is not a problem at all because the life span is over 1000 hrs anyway. 

Stylus replacement is necessary if the stylus is worn and exceeded it's life span stated by the manufacturer in the manual. Or if it was damaged. 

Also any stylus can be inspected by professionals for very little fee under $30.