1/4'' ding / chip on a glossy black speaker


.....I called some piano repair professionals and they would not touch it .....any ideas ?????
garebear
Try to find a local furniture repair woodworker. It will probably be very costly to be returned to as new condition if that's even possible, but they should be able to make it look much better for a more reasonable cost.
Before you do anything you'll need to find out what kind of paint is on the speaker and if it has a clear coat. Once you have that, try a body shop and/or a place that does powder coating.
Try black auto touchup paint (usually in the little glass vial with a small brush). I've used this to touch up a black electric guitar ding and it can work. Use multiple coats and wet sand with small grit followed by some car wax to fine finish it.
"06-05-15: Wolf_garcia
Try black auto touchup paint (usually in the little glass vial with a small brush). I've used this to touch up a black electric guitar ding and it can work. Use multiple coats and wet sand with small grit followed by some car wax to fine finish it."

Something like that can work but you must know what kind of paint is on the speaker before you start. Its very common to come across different types of paint that won't work together.
Enamels and epoxy paints can be applied to any other type of
paint. Most enamels don't sand or rub out as nicely
though(too soft). Lacquers have more aggressive thinners that
will cause problems, if applied to other paint systems.
Power coat? LOL! Power coatings are electrostatically
applied(sprayed/surface has to conduct electricity) and then
baked, at almost 400 degrees(F). Unless your cabinet is
metal: forget about it!
"Power coat? LOL! Power coatings are electrostatically
applied(sprayed/surface has to conduct electricity) and then
baked, at almost 400 degrees(F). Unless your cabinet is
metal: forget about it! "

How do you know the OP doesn't have metal cabnets? My best friend had his Meridian 8000's fixed at a shop that did powder coating. I assume his speakers were metal; the Meridians that I had were.

I said this for a reason.

"Something like that can work but you must know what kind of paint is on the speaker before you start."
Like I said, "Unless your cabinet is metal: forget about it!" That DOES allow for the possibility of the OP's cabinet being metal. In that case; he would have to have the entire cabinet stripped(sand blasted), as powder coatings cannot be touched up. Chips in powder coating can be filled in with conventional paints, but- that never does look quite right.
1/4"? Forget about it. Touch it up with a black Sharpie pen and don't look for it. Automotive paint can work too, but try the Sharpie first. It hurts when your precious stuff gets damaged, but most people who try to fix things mess it up worse than it was before. Very few people do things right.
I 100% agree with Chayro, get out the Sharpie pen and do the best you can. After all, we're talking about a 1/4" defect - this is hardly something to stress about. Dim the lights and enjoy your system...

-RW-
"06-05-15: Rodman99999
Like I said, "Unless your cabinet is metal: forget about it!" That DOES allow for the possibility of the OP's cabinet being metal."

I didn't mean to snap at you. Sorry.
Not a problem, Zd! We're both trying to help the OP. Happy listening!
I've found a black Sharpie very valuable for hiding minor dings/scratches in black finishes too. The tough part, personally(being somewhat obsessive), is forgetting about it afterwards.
If they are really wood cabinets and you want them to have that natural look do this. Get yourself an experienced professional woodworker, by which I mean, woodpecker. They will make those cabinets look identical. Sorry, just couldn't resist. Check with the speaker manufacturer if you can. Hopefully they will give you some ideas. There is a lot that can be done with most speakers finish's.
Garebear,

I had a couple of 1/4 inch chips on my piano black Merlin VSM's repaired by Merlin for around $50 to $60 per chip.
The aforementioned auto touch up paint, if it looks like it matches color wise, works with just about any finish as it's more like sticky nail polish than normal paint.